Warren Wilson College Catalog 06-07

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ANT 105 Survey of Latin America 4cr

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to 600 years of Latin American history and culture, with special emphasis on the contributions from indigenous and African peoples. Students will examine literature, geography, art, religion, and politics, always keeping in mind the relationship between the United States and the rest of the hemisphere.
Triad: Social Science or Language/Global Issues

ANT 139 Native Americans of the Southeast 4cr

This course is a cultural history that explores the Native American cultures of the southeastern United States through archaeology, ethnography, and ethnohistory. The class is designed as a survey course and will include major discussions of Native American prehistory (archaeology), the Contact period, ethnography and ethnohistory of the Colonial period, the Removal Era, and southeastern Native Americans in the 20th century. Triad: Social Science

ANT 145 Archaeology of World Cultures 4cr

This is a survey of world prehistory from the time of our earliest known human ancestors five million years ago to the rise of state-level societies, as exemplified by the civilizations of ancient Mesopotamia and Mesoamerica. We explore cultural processes including the migration of our species throughout the world as hunter-gatherers, the beginning of settled life, and the evolution of cultural complexity with tribal and chiefly societies. Triad: Social Science

ANT 146 Archaeological Methods 4cr

An introduction to archaeological excavation and methods of artifact analysis. Students explore basic artifact identification, classification, and cataloging, and practice basic excavation methods during field exercises. The class will also study research designs in order to learn how these methods contribute to understanding current issues in western North Carolina archaeology. May be repeated for credit as ANT 147. Triad: Social Science

ANT 199 Independent Study 1-4cr

ANT 200 Introduction to Anthropology 4cr

This course takes a cultural approach to anthropology in order to provide an appreciation for the diversity of the human experience and to relate culture to other concepts such as gender, religion, ecology, change, and power. The course will also closely examine a small number of case studies from distant lands and from the United States. Triad: Social Science.

ANT 224 Folklife in Modern America 4cr * (2006-07)

The processes through which certain ethnic and cultural groups in America have maintained folk traditions in contemporary contexts are explored. Material such as stories, songs, regional architecture, religious rituals, and foodways are examined. Specific groups considered include Indians, rural whites, African-Americans, and two North Carolina subcultures-Waldensians and Moravians. Triad: Social Science

ANT 239 Physical Anthropology 4cr * (2006-07)

This course is a survey of physical anthropology that focuses on human evolution and human variation. Course topics include primate studies and hominid evolution as well as the study of the dispersal of modern Homo sapiens across the globe. We will look at human biological variation with respect to culture to examine such ideas as the relationship between population characteristics and their environments and the effect of disease on differing populations. We will also examine the role of physical anthropology in archaeology and forensic science.

ANT 241 Native Peoples of Mexico and Guatemala 4cr * (2007-08)

This course takes an historical approach to investigate political, economic, religious, and cultural developments in indigenous Mexico and Guatemala beginning with a brief survey of pre-Hispanic Mexico and Guatemala, continuing up to the present, and focusing on how indigenous cultures, forms of government, and religious practices developed as a complex process in situations of unequal power. Triad: Social Science or Language/Global Issues

ANT 251 Latin American Archaeology 4cr * (2007-08)

This course is an introduction to the archaeology of Mesoamerica and South America. The class will study the history of Latin American archaeology and explore the broad range of human cultural history in these regions. The class will focus on Formative, Classic, and Post-Classic cultural expressions with the particular emphasis on the rise of complex societies in Mexico and in the Andean region. Triad: Social Science
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and ANT 105 Survey of Latin America or ANT 145 Archaeology of World Cultures

ANT 279 Supervised Internship in Anthropology 1-16cr

The internship is a supervised work experience in an approved setting. One academic credit may be earned for each 40 hours of work in the internship placement.
Prerequisite: Departmental approval, prior to registration, of a written proposal that describes in detail the activities and educational objectives of the intern. Application materials may be obtained from Anthropology faculty members or the Social Sciences Department Chair.

ANT 290-298 Special Topics in Anthropology 2-4cr

In-depth consideration of a topic of particular concern within the disciplines of anthropology. May be repeated for credit under different topics.

ANT 299 Independent Study 1-4cr

ANT 321 Traditional Agriculture 4cr * (2006-2007)

This course examines the origins of agriculture and the role agriculture plays in the evolution of cultural complexity. The course employs a cultural ecology and ecosystems approach, which considers agriculture as an integral part of the environment in which it is practiced (this includes the cultural environment as well as the physical environment). This course deals primarily with pre-industrial and, for the most part, non-commercial agricultural systems.

ANT 337 Appalachian Folk Medicine: Plants and Healing Traditions 4cr

Folk medicine topics such as Cherokee influences on early European immigrants, garden-grown herbs and wild plants, magic religious beliefs, and traditions associated with plant use are considered through field study, visits with contemporary healers, and a survey of printed resources. Triad: Social Science

ANT 338 Archaeology and the Environment 4cr * (2006-07)

This course explores the relationship or interaction between people and their environments through the disciplines of archaeology and anthropology. Among the topics that may be explored are "Garbology," Pleistocene extinctions, human domestication of plants and animals, climate and culture, and Native Americans and their environments. Triad: Social Science
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

ANT 340 Archaeological Field School 4cr Summer

This is a summer field course involving archaeological excavation and survey in the Appalachian region. Excavations usually take place on prehistoric pre-Cherokee sites. Other types of prehistoric and historic sites may also be considered. The course includes instruction in excavating methodology, on-site excavation work, and classroom instruction in archaeological theory and the archaeology of the region. May be repeated for credit as ANT 341.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ANT 390-398 Special Topics in Anthropology 2-4cr

In-depth consideration of a topic of particular concern within the discipline of anthropology. May be repeated for credit under different topics.

ANT 399 Independent Study 1-4cr

ANT 415 American Subcultures 4cr * (2007-08)

This course surveys different contemporary and recent subcultures (music-based youth, criminal, conspiracy-oriented, religions, and those based on alternative forms of sexuality and kinship) through the lens of various modes of social analysis in order to appreciate the diversity of our society and to examine issues such as power, class, gender, sexuality, and resistance. Triad: Social Science or College Composition II
Prerequisites: ANT 200 Introduction to Anthropology and junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.

ANT 431-433 Topics in Latin American Anthropology 2cr * (2007-08)

Each time this course is taught, it will address a different issue or event that receives a great deal of attention in contemporary Latin American anthropology. Students will explore the topic in depth, using current anthropological journals and recent books. Recent topics have included "Politics of Indigenous Culture in Latin America," "Gender Identity in Latin America," "Scandal and Controversy in Latin American Anthropology," "Native Peoples of Southern Mexico," and "Issues in Mayan Studies." The course may be repeated for credit as long as the topic has changed. Partial Completion of
Triad: Social Science or Language/Global Issues
Prerequisite: ANT 200 Introduction to Anthropology or ANT 241 Native Peoples of Mexico and Guatemala.

ANT 479 Supervised Internship in Anthropology Triad: 1-16cr

The internship is a supervised work experience in an approved setting. One academic credit may be earned for each 40 hours of work in the internship placement.
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and departmental approval, prior to registration, of a written proposal that describes in detail the activities and educational objectives of the intern. Application materials may be obtained from Anthropology faculty members or the Social Sciences Department Chair.

ANT 490-498 Special Topics in Anthropology 2-4cr

In-depth consideration of a topic of particular concern within the disciplines of anthropology. May be repeated for credit under different topics.

ANT 499 Independent Study 1-4cr