Warren Wilson College Catalog 06-07

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Global Studies

Faculty: David Abernathy (Chair), Luis Arevalo, Ben Feinberg, Dongping Han,Siti Kusujiarti, Hun Lye, Paul Magnarella, David G. Moore, Joan Moser, William E. Mosher, Angela Marie Phillips, Lynn Pohl, Jeanne Sommer, Andrew Summers

The Global Studies major provides an interdisciplinary program of study and experiential learning for students wanting both in-depth knowledge of a world region and fuller understanding of the processes connecting that region to the rest of the world. The department seeks to prepare students to be responsible citizens of the world by challenging them to engage contemporary global issues, to address the historical and geographical contexts of global inequalities, and to examine a particular region of the world from a perspective that integrates the humanities, the social sciences and environmental studies. Each concentration provides opportunities for in-depth investigations of human experiences and interactions with social and natural environments. Introductory courses provide an overview of world geography, specific introductions to world regions, and the perspectives of different disciplines. Upper level courses combine some comparative breadth across different regions and disciplines and depth gained from a focus on one region. The major also requires language study, experiential education away from the campus, and a senior level "capstone" seminar.

PROGRAM PROPOSAL: Advanced planning with a Global Studies advisor is essential to successful and timely completion of all the major requirements. A written Global Studies major proposal must be approved by the Global Studies faculty and should be submitted to the advisor and to the Chair of Global Studies for approval no later than one month before registration during the second semester of the sophomore year or, for transfer students, during the first term of the junior year.

CONCENTRATIONS: Students who elect the Global Studies major must choose one of the following four tracks, or concentrations:

1. Asian Studies

This concentration explores Asia from the interdisciplinary vantage points of history, political science, sociology, religious studies, philosophy, peace and Justice studies, environmental studies, and women's studies. Students are expected to participate in one cross-cultural field experience in Asia and to complete a capstone project that demonstrates the student's ability to undertake research in Asian studies. In addition to preparing students for graduate school, this concentration opens employment opportunities in areas such as international relations, international development programs, international business, non-governmental organizations, and governmental agencies with connections to Asia, and other service-oriented careers.

2. Latin American Studies

This concentration explores Latin America and the Caribbean from an interdisciplinary vantage point. History, literature, anthropology, language, economics, cultural studies, film, politics, geography, and experiential learning provide the backdrop for discovering this vast region in terms of constructions developed both by external researchers and by Latin Americans themselves. In addition to preparing students for graduate school, this concentration opens employment opportunities in areas such as international relations, international development programs, international business, non-governmental organizations, governmental agencies with connections to Latin America, journalism, and other service-related careers. Fluency in Spanish is at the core of the concentration, as competence with the language is necessary for a deep understanding of the region.

3. Intercultural Studies

The focus of this concentration is cross-cultural and international understanding and reflection. The wide range of courses reflects the concentration's emphasis on the link between macro and micro level approaches to global issues. This concentration mixes courses that analyze regional, social, political, cultural, and economic issues with experience-based learning. To this end, all students are expected to spend at least one term engaged in study abroad.

General Requirements: The specific requirements for the Global Studies major vary depending on the concentration. However, all the concentrations require 44 credits distributed according to this basic formula and described in more detail below.

  1. Introductory Courses (12 credits)
  2. Global Studies Depth Requirement (20 credits)
  3. Global Studies Breadth Requirement (8 credits)
  4. Upper level "Capstone" Requirement (4 credits)
  5. Off Campus Experience
  6. Language Proficiency Requirement

Of the 44 total credits, at least 16 must be upper level credits, including at least 8 credits within the concentration, 4 credits from other concentrations, and 4 senior capstone credits.

1. Introductory Courses

The Global Studies major requires GBL 116 Introduction to Geography for all of its concentrations. Each concentration has different requirements for the other eight introductory credits, as follows:

ASIAN STUDIES

GBL 116 Introduction to Geography
HIS 111 East Asian Civilization
Additional intro course*

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

GBL 116 Introduction to Geography
ANT 105 Survey of Latin America
Additional intro course*

INTERCULTURAL STUDIES

GBL 116 Introduction to Geography
HIS 111 East Asian Civilization
OR ANT 105 Survey of Latin America
Additional intro course*

*Additional intro course defined: The additional intro courses include any course from the following list:

ANT 200 Introduction to Anthropology
ECO 201 Microeconomics
ENS 116 Introduction to Environmental Studies
PAX 110 Introduction to Peace and Justice Studies
PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology
REL 111 Exploring Religions
SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology
SWK 201 Introduction to Social Work
SWK 202 Skills of Helping Others
WMS 100 Introduction to Women's Studies

2. Depth Requirement

Students must accumulate at least 20 credits of elective courses in their concentration, with at least one course from three different areas across this curriculum. At least 8 of these credits must come from 300-400 level courses. Note that courses taught at other institutions (such as Borderlinks or one of our partner colleges) may count towards the depth requirement. Students should consult with their advisors to determine whether courses not listed below may count for their concentration.

ASIAN STUDIES: The selection must include courses from three of these four areas:

Sociology and Anthropology

SOC 251 Societies of Southeast Asia
SOC 325 Gender, Development, and the Environment
SOC 410 Directed Research in Sociology/Anthropology

History and Political Science

PSC 259 Comparative Governments: Third World
PSC 320 Chinese Government and Politics
PSC 340 International Politics in the Pacific

Philosophy and Religious Studies

PHI 361 Eastern Thought
REL 111 Exploring Religions
REL 238 History and Literature of Buddhism
REL 239 Hinduism: Texts and Tradition
REL 338 Chan/Zen Buddhism
REL 380 East Asian Religions: Seminar

Global Studies

GBL 356 Cross Cultural Field Study OR
GBL 394 International Field Study OR
GBL 395 International Development Practicum

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES: The selection must include courses from these three areas:

Sociology and Anthropology

ANT 241 Native Peoples of Mexico and Guatemala
ANT 251 Latin America Archaeology
ANT 431-435 Topics in Latin American Anthropology

Language and Literature

LAN 353 Hispanic Culture and Civilization
LAN 364 Advanced French
LAN 455 Hispanic Short Stories and Poetry
LAN 465 Francophone Literature

History, Political Science, and Economics

BA 310 Introduction to Non-Profit Management
ECO 383 Economic Growth and Development
HIS 241 Latin American Civilization
PSC 330 Politics of Developing States

INTERCULTURAL STUDIES: The selection must include courses from three of these four areas:

Anthropology, Sociology, and Social Work

ANT 105 Survey of Latin America
ANT 145 Archaeology of World Cultures
ANT 241 Native Peoples of Mexico and Guatemala
ANT 431-433 Topics in Latin American Anthropology
SOC 251 Societies of Southeast Asia
SOC 261 Societies of Sub-Saharan Africa
SOC 271 Environmental Sociology
SOC 296 Societies of Sub-Saharan Desert
SOC 325 Gender, Development, and the Environment
SWK 291 Changing the World: International Social Service

Language and Literature

ENG 130 Scriptural and Doctrinal Backgrounds to Western Culture
ENG 347 Colonial and Postcolonial Literature
INT 316 Medieval Islamic Culture
LAN 353 Hispanic Culture and Civilization
LAN 354 Advanced Spanish
LAN 364 Advanced French
LAN 455 Hispanic Short Stories and Poetry
LAN 465 Francophone Literature

History, Political Science, and Economics

ECO 307 International Trade
ECO 383 International Economic Development
ENS 116 Introduction to Environmental Science
HIS 111 East Asian Civilization
HIS 241 Latin American Civilization
HIS 270 Modern German History
HIS 327 Renaissance and Reformation
HIS 328 England Since 1603
HIS 330 The Rise of Imperial Russia
HIS 331 Modern Russian History
PAX 230 Freedom and Dissent
PAX 239 Lifestyles of Nonviolence
PAX 320 The Palestinian Question
PAX 325 Resolving Conflict Local and Global
PAX 326 Human Rights
PSC 245 Environmental Politics in Global Perspective
PSC 257 International Relations
PSC 258 Comparative Governments: Industrialized States
PSC 259 Comparative Governments: Third World
PSC 320 Chinese Government and Politics
PSC 330 Politics of Developing States
PSC 336 United States Foreign Policy
PSC 340 International Politics in the Pacific

Philosophy and Religious Studies

PHI 115 Alternative Philosophies
PHI 252 Environmental Ethics
REL 111 Exploring Religions
REL 112 Women and Global Religious Traditions
REL 212 Religion, Nature, and the Environment
REL 238 History and Literature of Buddhism
REL 239 Hinduism: Texts and Tradition
REL 253 Emerging Christian Theologies
REL 338 Chan/Zen Buddhism
REL 380 East Asian Religions Seminar
REL 420 Religion, Peace, and Social Justice Case Studies
WRI 396 Journal Writing

3. Global Studies Breadth Requirement

Global Studies majors should be able to compare the area of the world that they concentrate in with other parts of the globe. All Global Studies majors must take eight credits of courses from the other areas within the major. For example, Asian Studies concentrators must take eight credits from courses that appear under requirement two for Latin American Studies, North American Studies, or Intercultural Studies, but that do not also count for an area two requirement for Asian Studies. Intercultural Studies concentrators may meet this requirement simply by taking an additional eight credits of courses that appear under any of these lists, including Intercultural Studies.

4. Off Campus Experience

The Global Studies major stresses the importance of experiential education. To this end, all students must complete part of their education away from the Warren Wilson College campus. The different concentrations have different expectations for this requirement, ranging from a term or semester studying in a foreign country, to a short Warren Wilson WorldWide course, to an internship or extended service project. This component of the major should be planned well in advance in consultation with the student's academic advisor. No credit will be given for "prior learning." This requirement should be met prior to the student's senior year and must be met prior to the student's last semester before graduation.

Asian Studies: Concentration must include a cross-cultural, off-campus experience in Asia (possibly through our partnerships with Asian universities, enrollment in a Warren Wilson WorldWide course, other academic programs in Asia, or personally designed field courses). Proposals for personally designed field courses should be submitted well in advance to the Asian Studies faculty. Up to six credits from a field course may count toward the major.

Latin American Studies: Concentrators must spend at least one term (eight weeks) studying off campus in a Latin American country. One way to satisfy this requirement is to enroll in one of the longer Warren Wilson WorldWide courses, such as the course that moves through Guatemala and Mexico, or to spend a semester at one of our partner institutions (such as the Universidad del Valle de Mexico or BorderLinks). Other proposed ways of meeting this requirement must be proposed well in advance to the Global Studies faculty.

Intercultural Studies: Concentrators must spend at least one term (eight weeks) or semester off campus. This can be accomplished through GBL 356 Cross-Cultural Field Study, GBL 394 International Field Study, GBL 395 International Development Practicum, or another off-campus intercultural study experience that is approved by the Global Studies faculty. Up to six credits from a single field course can count toward the major.

5. Language Proficiency Requirement

Global Studies majors should achieve proficiency in some language other than English. The basic requirement for the major is described as proficiency, defined as the equivalent of three semesters of college level study. Proficiency can be gained at Warren Wilson College, before students arrive at WWC, or through study at other institutions or in other countries. We recognize, however, that it is very difficult for students to take three semesters of Asian languages, for example, since WWC currently offers courses only in French and Spanish. Therefore, there is some flexibility in the language requirement, which varies across the concentrations.

Asian Studies: Students may meet the language requirement through proficiency in any language, as defined above, or through a combination of multiple languages, including two semesters of one language and one semester (or equivalent) in a second language (i.e. two semesters of French combined with one term of study in Thailand or a summer of study at a language school in Indonesia). If the student wishes to study more than one language, one of the languages should be an Asian language.

Latin American Studies: Students must go beyond proficiency. All Latin American Studies concentrators must pass LAN 354 Advanced Spanish with a grade of C or higher.

Intercultural Studies: As with Asian studies, students must achieve proficiency in any language other than English, or they may take two semesters of one language and one semester (or its equivalent) of a second language.

6. Upper Level "Capstone" Requirement

All Global Studies majors must successfully complete the Global Studies Capstone Seminar. This seminar, taught each fall, provides majors with an opportunity to write a thesis that synthesizes and reflects upon their combination of coursework and off-campus intercultural experiences. This course fulfills the College Composition II requirement.

Minors in Global Studies

Appalachian Studies

faculty: Phil Jamison

Because the College is located in the heart of Southern Appalachia, it offers a minor in Appalachian Studies. Its aim is to encourage intercultural awareness among all students and to prepare students for work in such professions as social work, teaching, and community development.

Requirements: A minimum of 24 credits from the following, with a minimum GPA of 2.0:

  1. One approved 4-credit introductory course
  2. At least one of the following:
    ANT 200 Introduction to Anthropology
    SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology

  3. At least 12 credits from the following:
    ANT 139 Native Americans of the Southeast
    ANT 337 Appalachian Folk Medicine: Plants and Healing Traditions
    ANT 340 Archaeological Field School
    MUS 160 Appalachian String Band
    MUS 232 Appalachian Music and Dance
    Selected Music Courses
    Selected Special Topics courses

Intercultural Studies

Requirements: 24 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, including a minimum of 12 credits from 300-400 level courses distributed in the following manner:

  1. GBL 116 Introduction to Geography
  2. 8-14 credits of additional intercultural studies courses, as approved by the department.
  3. An approved international internship, cross-cultural work or study, short-term field study, or an appropriate alternative experience (2-8 credits). It may be possible to meet this requirement by writing a major paper on a previous or current cross-cultural experience.

Latin American Studies

Requirements: 28 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, distributed as follows:

  1. Language requirement: 8 credits of Spanish language instruction beyond Spanish III. Students who place into levels other than Spanish I will meet the language requirement by passing LAN 354 Advanced Spanish with a minimum grade of C. In this case, students are expected to enroll in additional courses, listed in Section 2, to complete a total of 24 credits.
  2. Content-Specific Core: 8 credits selected from the listing below. GBL 291, 356, 394, and 395 need to be taken in conjunction with a trip to Latin America. Only 4 credits from those courses may be applied toward the minor.

  3. ANT 105 Survey of Latin America
    ANT 241 Native Peoples of Mexico and Guatemala
    ANT 431-433 Topics in Latin American Anthropology
    ECO 383 Economic Growth and Development
    HIS 241 Latin American Civilization
    GBL 291 Seminar Guatemala/Mexico
    GBL 356 Cross-Cultural Field Study
    GBL 394 International Field Study
    GBL 395 International Development Practicum
    LAN 353 Hispanic Culture and Civilization
    LAN 455 Hispanic Short Stories and Poetry
    LAN 494 Latin American Film
    LAN 499 Independent Study
    PSC 330 Politics of Developing States
    Selected Special Topics courses
    Courses listed in the Mars Hill and UNCA Catalogs previously identified as Latin American Studies courses.