13-14 College Catalog

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Table of Contents: 2013-2014 Warren Wilson College Catalog 0.1 Academic Calendar 0.2 Warren Wilson College Catalog 0.3 From the President 0.4 Accreditation and Memberships 0.5 Table of Contents 1.01 Mission, Values, Objectives, and Vision 1.02 College Profile 1.03 History 1.04 Undergraduate Admission 1.05 Financial Aid 1.06 Withdrawal and Refund Policy 1.07 Student Life 1.08 Special Facilities 1.09 Resources and Educational Opportunities 1.10 PEW Learning Center and Ellison Library 2.1 Work Program 2.2 Service Program 2.3 Academic Policies and Regulations 2.4 Baccalaureate Degree Requirements 3 Programs of Study 3.2 Undergraduate Programs of Study 3.2.01 Art 3.2.02 Biology 3.2.03 Business 3.2.04 Chemistry 3.2.05 Creative Writing 3.2.06 Education 3.2.07 English 3.2.08 Environmental Studies 3.2.09 Gender and Women's Studies 3.2.10 Global Studies 3.2.11 History and Political Science 3.2.12 Integrative Studies 3.2.13 Mathematics 3.2.14 Modern Languages 3.2.15 Music 3.2.16 Outdoor Leadership 3.2.17 Peace and Justice Studies 3.2.18 Philosophy 3.2.19 Physics 3.2.20 Psychology 3.2.21 Religious Studies 3.2.22 Social Work 3.2.23 Sociology/Anthropology 3.2.24 Sustainable Business 3.2.25 Theatre 3.2.26 Women's Studies 3.2.27 Writing 3.3 Graduate Program 3.3.1 Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing 3.4 Specialized Advising Areas 3.4.1 Pre-Law Advising 3.4.2 Pre-Medical and Pre-Allied Health Advising 3.4.3 Pre-Peace Corps, International, and Non-Governmental Service Advising 3.4.4 Pre-Veterinary Medicine Advising 4.01 Courses of Instruction 4.02 Anthropology (ANT) 4.03 Art (ART) 4.04 Biology (BIO) 4.05 Business (BA) 4.06 Chemistry (CHM) 4.07 Economics (ECO) 4.08 Education (EDU) 4.09 English (ENG) 4.10 Environmental Studies (ENS) 4.11 Gender and Women's Studies (GDS) 4.12 Global Studies (GBL) 4.13 History (HIS) 4.14 Interdepartmental (INT) 4.15 Modern Language (LAN) 4.16 Mathematics (MAT) 4.17 Music (MUS) 4.18 Outdoor Leadership (ODL) 4.19 Peace and Justice Studies (PAX) 4.20 Philosophy (PHI) 4.21 Physical Education (PED) 4.22 Physics (PHY) 4.23 Political Science (PSC) 4.24 Psychology (PSY) 4.25 Religious Studies (REL) 4.26 Science (SCI) 4.27 Social Work (SWK) 4.28 Sociology (SOC) 4.29 Theatre (THR) 4.30 Writing (WRI) 5.1 Administration and Staff 5.2 Undergraduate Faculty 5.2.1 Library Faculty and Staff 5.2.2 Staff Teachers 5.3 Graduate Faculty and Staff 6.1 Board of Trustees 6.2 Alumni Board 6.3 Endowed Scholarships 7.1 Index of Sections

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Laura L Vance
Sociology

Laura Vance Address:
WWC CPO 6206
PO Box 9000
Asheville, NC 28815-9000

Phone: 828.771.5851

Email: lvance@warren-wilson.edu

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4.11 Gender and Women's Studies (GDS)

Course meets Triad Education Program Requirement in specified area.


GDS 100 - Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies 4cr

This course focuses on critical examination and understanding of the social construction of gender. Students explore a range of gendered experiences, including gender socialization, body image, reproductive rights, gender and work, and gendered violence, as well as how these differ by race, class, and sexuality. The course examines theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches to the critical examination of women's realities. This course provides a foundation for further courses in the Gender and Women's Studies major or minor.

Social Science


REL/GDS 112 - Women and Global Religious Traditions 4cr

This course focuses on women's experiences within religious traditions such as Christianity, Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Islam, and Neo-paganism. Questions concerning the status of women, strategies for empowering women within religions, similarities between male and female religious experience, women's work for social and environmental justice within religions, and ways that women are transforming global religious traditions are explored.

Philosophy/Religion or Language/Global Issues


SOC/GDS 211 - The Family 4cr

This course is a comparative study of the family as a social institution and as the most intimate environment of interpersonal relations. Students explore both theoretical perspectives and applied analytical approach of families in local and global environments. The main themes covered are diversity, change and problems faced by family as a social institution. Students have opportunities to critically analyze the connections between micro and macro level structures affecting various types of families.

Social Science


GDS 220 - Introduction to Gender and Men's Studies 4cr

This seminar examines the effects of gender ideologies and norms on the construction of masculine identities. Topics include the role of violence in masculine socialization and its effects, men's relationships with one another and with women, and men's sexuality and sexual ethics. Students explore how masculine socialization and men's experiences shape cultural, political, and religious ideas, symbols, rituals, institutions, and behavior, and are in turn shaped by them. Students read, discuss, and respond to a wide range of profeminist men's studies writers, considering issues men raise as they seek to clarify their identities and vocations at the beginning of the 21st century.


HIS/GDS 230 - Women in American History 4cr

This course examines the social history of women in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Students explore how such issues as race, region, ethnicity, and politics have shaped women's lives and how women, in turn, have shaped their lives in response to these issues. From examining women's history and arguing about its meaning, students should gain a richer understanding of women's experience and a new perspective on American history.

History/Political Science


ENG/GDS 254 - Gender Issues in the Nineteenth Century 4cr

This course concerns the controversial redefining of gender roles, for both women and men, that took place in the nineteenth century. In order to explore the cultural concerns about gender that perplexed and sometimes polarized society, students read a variety of literary works and cultural documents as they assess the complex matrix of cultural attitudes out of which evolved those dominant conceptions of manhood and womanhood that determine common modern constructions of gender.

Literature


PHI/GDS 258 - Feminist Philosophy 4cr

This course investigates several historical and contemporary feminist philosophical perspectives with the aim of enabling students not only to work critically through some important feminist critiques, but also to appreciate the diversity of feminist thought. The majority of the readings in this course focus on contemporary feminist perspectives.

Philosophy/Religion


ENG/GDS 273 - Literature by Women 4cr

This course focuses on English-language poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction prose by women and examines the aesthetic, social, and historical contexts in which these writings took place. Readings stretch from the Middle Ages to the present and represent writers primarily from England and the United States but also from several other countries around the world.

Literature


GDS 305 - Arab Women's Literature and Film 4cr

This course focuses on contemporary literature and film from the Arab World by women. Students see how authors and filmmakers work to subvert stereotypes that long prevail in the West. This course examines issues of gender, class, education, nationalism, and religion. The main focus is reading and discussion of the required texts and films, as well as additional readings and research in theory, criticism, history, religious studies, current events, and popular culture.

Literature


SOC/GDS 310 - Media and Social Inequality 4cr

This course allows students to examine the development of mass media and to examine data pertaining to the way in which different media operate. Students explore patterns of media ownership, including trends toward consolidation and conglomeration, and discuss ways in which these patterns may shape media content. In addition, course readings and discussions examine regulation of media, the influences of politics on media and of media on politics, media and violence, and the role of mass media in reflecting and/or shaping social inequality - particularly regarding race, class, gender, and sexual orientation. Students discuss tools and strategies for critical analysis of media and active responses to media. Satisfies requirement for the Sociology Concentration in the Sociology/Anthropology major.

Social Science

Prerequisite: SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology, ANT 200 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, GDS 100 Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies, or GDS 220 Introduction to Gender and Men's Studies.


SOC/GDS 324 - Social Inequality 4cr

This course examines major forms of social inequality, sociological theory and concepts pertaining to social inequality, and empirical research examining the extent and consequences of social inequality in the United States. The class employs the concept of social location to explore ways in which socioeconomic class, gender, race, and sexuality affect life chances, and considers sociological theory and data pertaining to ways in which systems of social inequality are maintained, reproduced, resisted, and changed.

Social Science

Prerequisite: SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology or ANT 200 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology or GDS 100 Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies, or permission of instructor.


ODL/GDS 325 - Women's Voices in Experiential Education 4cr

This course is taught in a seminar format, involving students in the exploration of feminist theory and practice as it relates to experiential education and outdoor adventure education. Through readings, discussions, speakers, and presentations, students explore feminist perspectives of outdoor leadership, the historical contributions of women, and some current issues and concerns for women in the field.

Prerequisite: Sophomore or junior standing.


SOC/GDS 325 - Gender, Development, and the Environment 4cr

This course examines the changes in gender relations and the lives of women in "developing" countries or the global South as effected by the development process and their incorporation into global economic and political systems. Special focus is given to the interconnection of gender issues, development, and environmental problems in "developing" countries. Students will learn how local and global inequality affects gender relations and environmental conditions in various countries and how development programs and policies may alter the positions of women and gender relations.

Social Science or Language/Global Issues

Prerequisite: SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology or ANT 200 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology or GDS 100 Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies, or permission of instructor.


SOC/GDS 366 - Feminist Thought 4cr

Feminist thought is not one unified body, but has many influences and debates within it. Through primary source readings, discussion, and written work, students in this course explore the development of feminist thought, examine major feminist theoretical approaches and the key debates among feminists, and see how theory is applied to action.

Social Science

Prerequisites: GDS 100 Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.


ANT/GDS 380 - Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective 4cr

This course guides students through a critical examination of gender as both a social construct and a social practice in differing cross-cultural contexts from an anthropological perspective. Students begin with an examination of how gender has been defined as a category of analysis within the discipline of anthropology and how gendered experiences affect anthropological fieldwork and research. Students examine connections between gender, identity, and the body, as well as how gender plays out in the arenas of kinship, sexuality, ritual, and performance. In addition, students look at the role of gender in processes of nationalism and globalization and conclude with considerations of gender, power, and resistance. Of great concern throughout the course is the concept of gender diversity - the variety of ways in which gender is practiced and perceived in different historical and cultural environments. Satisfies requirement for Cultural Anthropology and Gender and Women's Studies Concentrations in the Sociology/Anthropology major.

Social Science or Language/Global Issues

Prerequisite: GDS 100 Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies or ANT 200 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, or permission of instructor.


GDS 401 - Gender and Social Change 4cr

This course explores fundamental questions of social organization and change. The focus is on gender relations as one of the key components of social ideology and structure, and the inquiry revolves around considerations of origins of social inequality, transformation of gender relations and societal organization, and both micro- and macro-level analyses of social transformation. This course serves as the capstone seminar for Gender and Women's Studies majors and minors. Accordingly, independent research is a major component of this cumulative requirement.

Social Science

Prerequisite: GDS 100 Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies.


SOC/GDS 402 - Sociology/Anthropology Research Craft 4cr

This course covers research methods specific to both sociology and anthropology through directed readings, lectures, and projects designed to prepare students for the applied research undertaken in SOC 410 Directed Research in Sociology/Anthropology. Focus will be on survey and field research, field notes, methods of ethnographic documenting, in-depth interviewing, content analysis, and questionnaire development. Students are required to have their research proposals approved by the Social Sciences Institutional Review Board by the end of the semester. This course is offered every fall semester.

Social Science

Prerequisites: SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology and ANT 200 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.


SOC/GDS 410 - Directed Research in Sociology/Anthropology 4cr

In this course, students will be engaged in applied research, write their theses and present their theses to the public. Students' work could be used in the following ways: by agencies in planning or policy development; in articles published for educational purposes; and for cultural documentation for museums, historical associations, communities and/or ethnic groups. Students are required to have their research proposal completed and approved by the Social Sciences Institutional Review Board before starting this course. This course is offered every Spring semester.

College Composition II

Prerequisites: SOC 402 Sociology/Anthropology Research Craft and approval of research proposal by the Social Sciences Institutional Review Board.


GDS 479 - Supervised Internship 1-8cr

The internship is a supervised work experience in an approved setting. One academic credit may be earned for each 40 hours of work in the internship placement.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and departmental approval, prior to registration, of a written proposal that describes in detail the activities and educational objectives of the intern. Application materials may be obtained from Gender and Women's Studies faculty members or the Social Sciences Department Chair.

Course meets Triad Education Program Requirement in specified area.