13-14 College Catalog

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Table of Contents: 2013-2014 Warren Wilson College Catalog 0.1 Academic Calendar 0.2 Warren Wilson College Catalog 0.3 From the President 0.4 Accreditation and Memberships 0.5 Table of Contents 1.01 Mission, Values, Objectives, and Vision 1.02 College Profile 1.03 History 1.04 Undergraduate Admission 1.05 Financial Aid 1.06 Withdrawal and Refund Policy 1.07 Student Life 1.08 Special Facilities 1.09 Resources and Educational Opportunities 1.10 PEW Learning Center and Ellison Library 2.1 Work Program 2.2 Service Program 2.3 Academic Policies and Regulations 2.4 Baccalaureate Degree Requirements 3 Programs of Study 3.2 Undergraduate Programs of Study 3.2.01 Art 3.2.02 Biology 3.2.03 Business 3.2.04 Chemistry 3.2.05 Creative Writing 3.2.06 Education 3.2.07 English 3.2.08 Environmental Studies 3.2.09 Gender and Women's Studies 3.2.10 Global Studies 3.2.11 History and Political Science 3.2.12 Integrative Studies 3.2.13 Mathematics 3.2.14 Modern Languages 3.2.15 Music 3.2.16 Outdoor Leadership 3.2.17 Peace and Justice Studies 3.2.18 Philosophy 3.2.19 Physics 3.2.20 Psychology 3.2.21 Religious Studies 3.2.22 Social Work 3.2.23 Sociology/Anthropology 3.2.24 Sustainable Business 3.2.25 Theatre 3.2.26 Women's Studies 3.2.27 Writing 3.3 Graduate Program 3.3.1 Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing 3.4 Specialized Advising Areas 3.4.1 Pre-Law Advising 3.4.2 Pre-Medical and Pre-Allied Health Advising 3.4.3 Pre-Peace Corps, International, and Non-Governmental Service Advising 3.4.4 Pre-Veterinary Medicine Advising 4.01 Courses of Instruction 4.02 Anthropology (ANT) 4.03 Art (ART) 4.04 Biology (BIO) 4.05 Business (BA) 4.06 Chemistry (CHM) 4.07 Economics (ECO) 4.08 Education (EDU) 4.09 English (ENG) 4.10 Environmental Studies (ENS) 4.11 Gender and Women's Studies (GDS) 4.12 Global Studies (GBL) 4.13 History (HIS) 4.14 Interdepartmental (INT) 4.15 Modern Language (LAN) 4.16 Mathematics (MAT) 4.17 Music (MUS) 4.18 Outdoor Leadership (ODL) 4.19 Peace and Justice Studies (PAX) 4.20 Philosophy (PHI) 4.21 Physical Education (PED) 4.22 Physics (PHY) 4.23 Political Science (PSC) 4.24 Psychology (PSY) 4.25 Religious Studies (REL) 4.26 Science (SCI) 4.27 Social Work (SWK) 4.28 Sociology (SOC) 4.29 Theatre (THR) 4.30 Writing (WRI) 5.1 Administration and Staff 5.2 Undergraduate Faculty 5.2.1 Library Faculty and Staff 5.2.2 Staff Teachers 5.3 Graduate Faculty and Staff 6.1 Board of Trustees 6.2 Alumni Board 6.3 Endowed Scholarships 7.1 Index of Sections

Interact

Catherine A Reid
Director, Creative Writing Program

Catherine Reid Address:
WWC CPO 6192
PO Box 9000
Asheville, NC 28815-9000

Phone: 828.771.2017

Email: creid@warren-wilson.edu

View Bio

4.30 Writing (WRI)

Course meets Triad Education Program Requirement in specified area.


WRI 105 - Weekly Writing Sessions 1cr

All writers benefit from sharing and discussing their work with knowledgeable, interested readers. This course provides such an opportunity, pairing each student writer with a peer tutor from the Writing Center for weekly one-on-one writing sessions. With the peer tutor's support, the student writer works on planning, drafting, revising, and editing papers assigned for other classes. Some students bring creative writing. Some use the sessions as check-ins during long research projects, bringing notes, insights, outlines, questions, and drafts. The Writing Center director oversees the course. Grading is based on participation and a portfolio of work completed for other classes and worked on with the peer tutor. This course may be taken twice, each time for a single credit. May be repeated for a second single credit as WRI 206.


WRI 120 - College Composition I 4cr

Writing forms the means of liberal inquiry in any discipline. Students in this course develop their thinking through a variety of expository prose. They work toward improved clarity and organization by writing multiple drafts of their essays and by participating in peer reviews. Students practice locating, integrating, and citing primary or secondary source material into their writing, and they learn to edit their own writing, checking for correct usage, mechanics, spelling, and punctuation. Although sections of College Composition I are organized thematically, improved writing remains the goal of every course as students become familiar with the process needed to produce clear and organized expository prose.

College Composition I


WRI 140 - Creative Writing: Introduction 4cr

This course exposes students to the craft of writing poetry, fiction, and nonfiction by acquainting them with some of the conventions and terminology of each genre. Students read published authors to learn their techniques; they explore the uses of the workshop, including its demands and rewards; and they practice effectively giving and receiving feedback. In addition to completing writing exercises for each genre, students may also write critical annotations and may produce small portfolios of their own work.

Artistic Expression


WRI 142 - Introduction to Writing for the Media 4cr

Creative writing majors and those with an entrepreneurial or activist message to deliver benefit from expanding their abilities into the professional sphere. This course introduces students to the study and practice of writing in print and new media. Students research, write, and edit in a variety of formats, including newspaper (news and feature articles), magazine (feature and column), public relations (press release and promotional materials), and web (site content and blog). The class also introduces journalistic ethics and examines the media's role in society.


WRI 177 - ELL I: New Directions in Oral and Written Communication 4cr

In this course, students whose first language is not English engage in extensive study and practice of linguistic, paralinguistic and rhetorical structures for academic oral and written composition in the area of intercultural understanding. In addition to completing in-class exercises and participating in discussions, students complete an analytical notebook, short formal papers, and oral presentations. Students consult individually with the instructor and design exercises to fit individual needs in the development of critical reading, writing, and thinking in a U.S. college. This course is open to all non-native speakers of English and required by all English language learners who place below a high-advanced level on the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency test.


WRI 178 - ELL II: Academic Structures and Rhetoric for Composition 2-4cr

In this course, students whose first language is not English continue written and oral practice and instruction in English. They participate in discussion and oral presentation, write several short papers, prepare regular reading assignments, and complete grammar exercises as needed.

Prerequisite: WRI 177 ELL I: New Directions in Oral and Written Communication or permission of instructor.


WRI 207 - Teaching Writing in Communities 4cr

This course is designed for students who want to teach or tutor writing in college, high school, community settings, or abroad. Students examine writing practices of adolescents and adults, cultural and political dimensions of writing experiences, and local contexts of writing at Warren Wilson and in Buncombe County. Expectations include extensive reading, critical reading responses, a tutoring placement (on campus or through Service-Learning), field notes about tutoring, and a research paper.

College Composition II

Prerequisites: WRI 120 College Composition I and sophomore standing.


WRI 208 - Theory and Practice in Tutoring Writing 2cr

This course prepares students from all majors to work as interdisciplinary writing tutors at Warren Wilson and also gives them a foundation to teach and mentor in other school, service, and professional settings. Students analyze genres of academic writing; study theories of composing; and explore approaches to working with peers on grammar, style, structure, and argument. Students accepted to work in the Writing Center take this course during their first term on the crew. Students who wish to work on the crew and take this course should speak with the instructor prior to course registration about application procedures. Students not on the crew may take the course though they will have some assignments to complete in the Writing Center.

Prerequisites: WRI 120 College Composition I and permission of instructor.


WRI 210 - Creative Writing: Playwriting 4cr

Through this course, students develop an understanding of the craft of dramatic writing, improve their critical skills in the reading of plays, and are introduced to writing in the genre. Students write and revise scenes and a one-act play. The significance of character, motivation, voice, dialogue, tension, action, conflict, and other elements of dramatic craft are discussed and demonstrated, often in critical annotations. Drawing on the collaborative nature of playwriting, the course often works with directing and acting classes; student scenes are acted in class as a part of the workshop process and a collaborative production of 10-minute plays often culminates the semester. May be repeated for credit as WRI 310.

Artistic Expression

Prerequisite: WRI 140 Creative Writing: Introduction, or permission of instructor.


WRI 211 - Creative Writing: Poetry 4cr

Through this course, students develop an understanding of the craft of poetry, improve their critical skills in the reading of poems by others, and gain increased depth and flexibility in their writing of verse. Students write and revise poems in a variety of forms and engage in critical reading of published works (often writing critical annotations). They also actively take part in the process of the workshop, developing their abilities to offer useful responses to their peers' work and to translate critique into effective revision. Students may complete a portfolio presenting the evolution and accomplishment of their work over the semester.

Artistic Expression

Prerequisite: WRI 140 Creative Writing: Introduction, or permission of instructor.


WRI 212 - Creative Writing: Fiction 4cr

Through this course, students develop an understanding of the craft of fiction, improve their critical skills in the reading of fiction by others, and gain an increased depth and flexibility in their own fiction writing. Students write and revise short fiction following several models and engage in critical reading of published works (often writing critical annotations). They also actively take part in the process of the workshop, developing their abilities to offer useful responses to their peers' work and to translate critique into effective revision. Students may complete a portfolio presenting the evolution and accomplishment of their work over the semester.

Artistic Expression

Prerequisite: WRI 140 Creative Writing: Introduction, or permission of instructor.


WRI 213 - Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction 4cr

In this course, students write and revise several pieces and, in that process, are exposed to a range of strategies for shaping compelling nonfiction. They will read and study the work of published authors with the goal of identifying the characteristics of this relatively new genre. Work may range from memoir to travel narratives to the research-based essay. The course helps students to develop useful responses to their peers' work, an essential element of workshop participation. Students may complete a portfolio which includes early and more finished drafts of essays and critical annotations of the work of published writers.

Artistic Expression

Prerequisite: WRI 140 Creative Writing: Introduction, or permission of instructor.


WRI 220 - Writing About Place 4cr

Students develop a heightened awareness of their environment in this course through reading, writing, and experiencing their immediate surroundings in the Swannanoa Valley. Students read classic and current nature writing, one of the liveliest genres of nonfiction. Weekly writing assignments may culminate in a Journal of Place, a multi-media representation of local findings, or longer narratives that interweave personal stories with stories of the land.

Artistic Expression

Prerequisite: WRI 140 Creative Writing: Introduction, or permission of instructor.


WRI 230 - Modern English Grammar 2cr

In this course, students work to achieve a thorough command of English grammar and syntax so that they can compose and edit well their own and others' writing.


WRI 232 - Argumentation 4cr

This course is an intensive study of the theory and practice of argumentation, together with some consideration of the ethics of public deliberation. Selected classics in rhetoric (e.g., Plato's Gorgias, Mill's On Liberty) are read, discussed, and analyzed for their rhetorical precepts and as rhetorical models themselves. Major projects include classroom debate and an extended researched argumentative essay.

Composition II


WRI 300 - Literary Magazine: History & Editing 4cr

This course teaches students the history and purpose of literary magazines and literary publishing through reading, discussions, and magazine production. Students study the genre of "literary" poetry and prose: what it is and why it matters. The course is production-oriented and students read, analyze, and critique submissions and learn the process behind editorial decisions; they also learn basic copyediting. Students learn how to market and advertise literary magazines; solicit authors; acquire and publish visual art, poetry, prose, criticism, and book reviews of literary and academic merit; and design layouts using Adobe InDesign. This course includes editorial work, design, and marketing.

Prerequisites: WRI 120 College Composition, WRI 140 Creative Writing: Introduction, WRI 230 Grammar, and at least one other 200-level creative writing course; or permission of instructor.


WRI 301 - Reading Genre and Form 4cr

Understanding the characteristics of genre, the requirements of form, and the evolution of these modes helps students of writing (and students of literature) realize the possibilities of a piece of writing. Students also begin to understand how their generic and formal choices create the context in which we read and write. This course involves the close study of a specific genre and its related forms. Topics vary and may include: nature and environmental writing, literary journalism and the essay, short fiction, linked stories, confessional poetry, or the long poem. Consult the instructor for specific theme. May be repeated for credit one time as WRI 302.

Prerequisites: WRI 120 College Composition I and sophomore standing.


WRI 308 - Reading Contemporary Writers 4cr

In the arc of literary history, contemporary writing forms the trailing edge; and for student writers, the contemporary forms the immediate context in which they work. Entering the landscape of contemporary writing allows the student of writing (and the student of literature) to gain an awareness of the diversity of approaches and perspectives available and to consider their connections to historical roots. This course involves the close study of contemporary writing in multiple genres. Topics are organized around movements or themes, for example: Appalachian Writers, Gay and Lesbian Writers, Writers of the Diaspora, Latin American Writers, or WWC MFA Faculty. Consult the instructor for specific theme. May be repeated for credit one time as WRI 309.

Prerequisites: WRI 120 College Composition I and sophomore standing.


WRI 311 - Advanced Fiction Workshop 4cr

Students already familiar with writing fiction generate and revise new work and develop long-term goals that they can begin to approach with the help of this course. Students bring fiction to workshop for feedback to assist in the revision process, discuss structure and technique in published fiction (often in the form of written annotations), and complete writing exercises related to discussions of craft. Students meet individually with the course instructor to review the progress of their work. Students may complete a portfolio presenting the evolution and accomplishment of their work over the semester, and this project may suggest directions for their Senior Portfolio. May be repeated for credit as WRI 312.

Artistic Expression

Prerequisite: WRI 212 Creative Writing: Fiction, or permission of instructor


WRI 313 - Advanced Poetry Workshop 4cr

Students already familiar with writing poetry generate and revise new work and develop long-term goals that they can begin to approach with the help of this course. Students bring their poetry to the workshop for feedback to help them in the revision process, study the structure and technique in published poetry (often in the form of written annotations), and complete writing exercises related to the discussion of craft. Students meet individually with the course instructor to review the progress of their work. Students may complete a portfolio presenting the evolution and accomplishment of their work over the semester, and this project may suggest directions for their Senior Portfolio. May be repeated for credit as WRI 314.

Artistic Expression

Prerequisite: WRI 211 Creative Writing: Poetry, or permission of instructor.


WRI 316 - Advanced Creative Nonfiction Workshop 4cr

Students already familiar with writing creative nonfiction generate and revise new work and develop long-term goals they can begin to approach with the help of this course. Students bring nonfiction to the workshop for feedback to help on the revision process, discuss structure and technique in published nonfiction, often in the form of written annotations, and complete writing exercises related to the discussion of the craft. Students meet individually with the course instructor to review the progress of their work. Students may complete a portfolio presenting the evolution and accomplishment of their work over the semester, and this project may suggest directions for their Senior Portfolio. May be repeated for credit as WRI 317.

College Composition II or Artistic Expression

Prerequisite: WRI 213 Creative Writing Nonfiction or WRI 220 Writing About Place, or permission of instructor.


WRI 320 - Environmental Writing 4cr

In this course, students read and write pieces that can be categorized along a continuum extending from nature writing to environmental journalism, from radio essays to literary expositions. A strong emphasis is placed on the students' use in their writing assignments of information gained from careful observation and research. The class is visited by environmental writers who share their experience and insights in the field. Students collectively practice their editorial skills in crafting selected work for submission for publication.

College Composition II or Artistic Expression

Prerequisite: WRI 213 Creative Writing: Nonfiction or WRI 220: Writing About Place, or permission of instructor.


WRI 381 - Research in Creative Writing 4cr

Students new to creative writing are often not aware of the substantial work many creative writers do to give their work a solid grounding in fact. Reading the work of published authors, students in this course detect the underpinning of research in creative work. Students then develop projects in poetry, fiction or nonfiction that draw upon their previous studies in both creative writing and other fields, seeking a fruitful intersection of these creative genres and another discipline. They pursue these projects by seeking information discovered through individual research (including archival and field work as well as interviews), current course work in other disciplines, and the assistance of librarians and other faculty. The course is organized around an individual research plan developed specifically for each student project.

College Composition II

Prerequisites: 300-level writing course and permission of instructor.


WRI 394 - Creative Writing: MFA Residency 2cr

Advanced writing students experience a rigorous and immersive course that takes them through a portion of the curriculum of the MFA Winter Residency, engaging them in graduate-level discourse and offering them some sense of the graduate school experience. Students are present for the ten-day January residency of the College's MFA Program, where they attend the readings, lectures, and courses offered by MFA faculty and graduating students. Alongside these events, students engage in seminar discussion of topics raised in the Residency, pursue the readings in greater detail, and map a workplan for the upcoming workshop. Students may enroll in WRI 394 alone but are strongly encouraged to enroll in the sequence. They cannot take WRI 395 Creative Writing: MFA Workshop without WRI 394. An application is required. May be repeated for credit.

Artistic Expression

Prerequisites: A 200 level course in Poetry, Fiction, or Nonfiction and permission of instructor.


WRI 395 - Creative Writing: MFA Workshop 2cr

This course extends the work of WRI 394 Creative Writing: MFA Residency into a mixed-genre advanced workshop. Students prepare an individual workplan outlining their creative and critical goals and defining the project that will constitute the work of the term. To achieve those goals they actively participate in the writing workshop: writing and revising their work, studying the work of professional authors (often writing critical annotations), and carefully critiquing the work of their peers. An application is required. May be repeated for credit.

Artistic Expression

Prerequisites: WRI 394 Creative Writing: MFA Residency and permission of instructor.


WRI 419 - Senior Writing Portfolio 2cr

This course offers guidance to senior creative writing majors, minors, and those with a creative writing concentration in the English major as they complete their senior writing project. The course helps students to set a revision schedule, to organize the manuscript, and to draft and revise the introduction to the portfolio. The course initiates a discussion, with the help of occasional guests, about the rest of the students' lives as writers, including graduate school, careers for writers, submitting work, publishing, and writers' organizations. Students also plan and prepare for their senior reading. Graduating students may enroll in either fall or spring semester, but must be prepared to submit their Senior Portfolio in the same semester.

Prerequisite: Senior standing as a creative writing major or minor or English / creative writing major, a 300-level writing course, or permission of instructor.


WRI 484 - Internship Seminar 2cr

This course is designed for creative writing and English-creative writing majors who choose to complete a one-semester internship, defined as a short-term experience of writing in a professional setting in which the student sets, achieves, and reflects on specific learning outcomes. This course formalizes the experience and involves a minimum of three meetings each semester, with additional and regular supervisor and peer-group meetings throughout the 16 weeks; the initial course involves the matching of students with available internships and with appropriate ways to support the subsequent experience. The internship, which may take place on or off campus, may include any phase of the writing process, including the researching, writing, and editing of documents; the designing and facilitating of creative writing workshops; or the handling of media needs for non-profit organizations. Students create a statement that includes expected outcomes, specific tasks to be completed, and a plan for periodic supervisor evaluation and self-evaluation. Upon completion of the internship, students file a self-reflection essay, compile a portfolio of work completed, and give a group presentation on the process. Students involved in an internship experience over summer or winter break should enroll in WRI 484 Internship Seminar in the following semester to complete the reflective component and share their learning with the community. Credit for an internship may not be duplicated with additional enrollment in WRI 485 Creative Writing Internship.

Prerequisite: At least junior standing as a creative writing major or minor or English major with a concentration in creative writing, or permission of instructor.


WRI 485 - Creative Writing Internship 1-8cr

An internship is a short-term experience of writing in a professional setting in which the student sets, achieves, and reflects on specific learning outcomes with the oversight of a professional mentor. An internship may include any phase of the writing process, including researching, drafting, revising, editing, and designing documents. An internship is inevitably self-directed and involves mature goal-setting and accountability. A student seeking an internship must file an Internship Plan, which includes a statement of expected outcomes, specific tasks to be completed, and a plan for periodic supervisor evaluation and self-evaluation. Upon completion of the internship, the student files a self-reflection essay and a portfolio of work completed. Students should see the Director of Undergraduate Writing for full internship guidelines. A required internship form is available from the Registrar.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and prior approval of a written Internship Plan by a site supervisor and the Director of Undergraduate Writing.

Course meets Triad Education Program Requirement in specified area.