Anthropology (ANT)

Course meets Triad Education Program Requirement in specified area.



Sociology/Anthropology Program of Study

Link to Sociology/Anthropology Program of Study



ANT 139 – Native Americans of the Southeast 4cr

This course is a cultural history that explores the Native American cultures of the southeastern United States through archaeology, ethnography, and ethnohistory. The class is designed as a survey course and includes major discussions of Native American prehistory (archaeology), the Contact period, ethnography and ethnohistory of the Colonial period, the Removal Era, and southeastern Native Americans in the 20th century.

Social Science



ANT 144 – North American Archaeology 4cr

This course is a survey of North American archaeology including prehistoric and historic periods to consider Native American, frontier, and colonial cultures. A regional approach explores the temporal and geographic range of cultures present in North America with an emphasis on the Southeastern and Southwestern regions. Students examine cultural processes including the emergence and migration of Native Americans in North America, hunter-gatherer traditions, and the evolution of cultural complexity in North America. Satisfies requirement for Archaeology Concentration.

Social Science



ANT 145 – Archaeology of World Cultures 4cr

This course is a survey of world prehistory from the time of our earliest known human ancestors five million years ago to the rise of state-level societies, as exemplified by the civilizations of ancient Mesopotamia and Mesoamerica. Students explore cultural processes including the migration of our species throughout the world as hunter-gatherers, the beginning of settled life, and the evolution of cultural complexity with tribal and chiefly societies. Satisfies requirement for Archaeology Concentration.

Social Science



ANT 148 – Archaeological Field Methods 4cr

This course is an introduction to archaeological field methods. Students learn basic concepts of archaeology as they relate to field investigations and learn and practice basic field methods. Hands-on field exercises include site identification and recording, site excavation, mapping, and reporting. Students also consider the role that archaeological methods play in developing research designs and in explaining archaeological phenomena. Satisfies requirement for Archaeology Concentration.



ANT 200 – Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 4cr

This course takes a cultural approach to anthropology in order to provide an appreciation for the diversity of the human experience. This survey course addresses topics such as the nature of culture, language and communication, ecology and subsistence, economic systems, kinship and family, gender, race, and other forms of identity, religion and magic, colonialism and globalization, culture and politics, and applied anthropology. The course will also closely examine a small number of case studies from distant lands and from the United States. Students will learn basic ethnographic methods and write an ethnographic paper based on original research.

Social Science



ANT 241 – Native Peoples of Mexico and Guatemala 4cr

This course takes a historical and thematic approach to political, economic, religious, and cultural developments in indigenous Mexico and Guatemala. The course begins with a survey of pre-Hispanic Mexico and Guatemala continuing up to the present, focusing on how indigenous cultures, forms of government, and religious practices developed as a complex process in situations of unequal power. Students read classic and contemporary anthropological texts and complete a short service project that involves engagement with our region’s Hispanic community. Satisfies requirement for Cultural Anthropology Concentration.

Social Science or Language/Global Issues



ANT 251 – Latin American Archaeology 4cr

This course is an introduction to the archaeology of Mesoamerica and South America. Students will study the history of Latin American archaeology and explore the broad range of human cultural history in these regions. Study focuses on Formative, Classic, and Post-Classic cultural expressions with particular emphasis on the rise of complex societies in Mexico and in the Andean region. Satisfies requirement for Archaeology Concentration.

Social Science or Language/Global Issues

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing



ANT 260 – Language and Culture 4cr

This course provides an introduction to Linguistics Anthropology–the study of the role of languages in the activities that make up the social life of individuals and communities. Topics include: language, thought, and culture; the ethnography of speaking and speech communities; sociolinguistics; language and race, gender, sexuality, and nation; performance; discourse and power; and language and technology. Students are evaluated on the basis of two exams and several written assignments, including a close analysis of a transcription of naturally occurring discourse and a research paper.

Social Science

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor



ANT 261 – Cultures of Sub-Saharan Africa 4cr

This is a thematic-based survey course covering the myriad cultures of sub-Saharan Africa. Students will become familiar with the geographic, historical, political, and social landscapes of the region as well as some of the important theories and debates that emerge from African studies. The first part of the course focuses on major factors in the history of sub-Saharan Africa, including colonialism and the Trans-Atlantic slave trade. The course then examines the effects of these and other globalizing and modernizing processes on the cultures of contemporary Africa and challenges students to recognize and deconstruct stereotypes and misrepresentations of African cultures. Satisfies requirement for Cultural Anthropology Concentration.

Social Science or Language/Global Issues



ANT 279 – Supervised Internship 1-16cr

The internship is a supervised work experience in an approved setting. One academic credit may be earned for each 40 hours of work in the internship placement.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval, prior to registration, of a written proposal that describes in detail the activities and educational objectives of the intern. Application materials may be obtained from Anthropology faculty members or the Social Sciences Department Chair.



ANT 311 – Culture and Religion 4cr

This course introduces students to both historical and current anthropological ideas in the study of religion and the supernatural. Students read classic theoretical texts as well as specific ethnographic and cultural studies from around the world. Students are encouraged to examine religion and religious practices from a broad, cross-cultural perspective. Discussion topics include ritual, taboo and magic, witchcraft and sorcery, shamanism and spirit mediumship, and mortuary and mourning practices. Religion is discussed as a social practice that has the potential to create peace and social cohesion as well as conflict and violence. Satisfies requirement for Cultural Anthropology Concentration.

Social Science or Language/Global Issues

Prerequisite: ANT 200 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology or permission of instructor.



ANT 315 – Dance, Culture, and Identity 4cr

From the Argentine Tango to American Hip-Hop, dance conveys meaning, inspires emotions, and communicates culture. This course takes an anthropological approach to the study of dance by examining it as a form of embodied cultural knowledge and a way of expressing cultural identities and histories. In studying several dance forms from around the world, students explore the ways in which dance can reveal, reinforce, and/or resist ideologies whether they are performed within national, ethnic, religious, local, or global contexts. Lastly, students discuss the history of dance ethnography and the benefits and challenges of doing dance research. Satisfies requirement for Cultural Anthropology Concentration.

Social Science

Prerequisite: ANT 200 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology or permission of instructor.



ANT 321 – Traditional Agricultural Systems 4cr

This course examines the origins of agriculture and the role agriculture plays in the evolution of cultural complexity. The course employs a cultural ecology and ecosystems approach, which considers agriculture as an integral part of the environment in which it is practiced (this includes the cultural environment as well as the physical environment). This course deals primarily with pre-industrial and, for the most part, non-commercial agricultural systems. Satisfies requirement for Cultural Anthropology Concentration.

Social Science

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.



ANT 338 – Archaeology and the Environment 4cr

This course explores the relationship or interaction between people and their environments through the disciplines of archaeology and anthropology. Among the topics that may be explored are “Garbology,” Pleistocene extinction, human domestication of plants and animals, climate and culture, and Native Americans and their environments. Satisfies requirement for Cultural Archaeology Concentration.

Social Science

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.



ANT 340 – Archaeological Field School 4cr

This is a four week summer field course involving archaeological excavation at the Berry archaeological site in Burke County, North Carolina. The Berry site is the location of the Native American town of Joara where Spanish soldiers built Fort San Juan in 1567, making this the earliest European settlement in the interior of the United States. Students learn all aspects of the investigations including excavation techniques, mapping, and specialized recovery techniques such as water-screening and flotation. This is an experiential course that allows each student to develop the skills necessary to engage in archaeological fieldwork. May be repeated for credit as ANT 341. Satisfies requirement for Archaeology Concentration.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.



ANT 342 – Archaeology Laboratory Methods 4cr

This course is an introduction to archaeological methods in the laboratory. Students learn about the processes linking laboratory and field work, learn to identify a variety of artifacts, and conduct hands-on analysis of excavated archaeological materials. Students also consider the role that laboratory methods play in developing research designs and in explaining archaeological phenomena and have the opportunity to apply these methods to actual research projects. Satisfies requirement for Archaeology Concentration.

Prerequisite: ANT 148 Archaeological Field Methods or ANT 340 Archaeological Field School.



ANT/GDS 380 – Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective 4cr

This course guides students through a critical examination of gender as both a social construct and a social practice in differing cross-cultural contexts from an anthropological perspective. Students begin with an examination of how gender has been defined as a category of analysis within the discipline of anthropology and how gendered experiences affect anthropological fieldwork and research. Students examine connections between gender, identity, and the body, as well as how gender plays out in the arenas of kinship, sexuality, ritual, and performance. In addition, students look at the role of gender in processes of nationalism and globalization and conclude with considerations of gender, power, and resistance. Of great concern throughout the course is the concept of gender diversity – the variety of ways in which gender is practiced and perceived in different historical and cultural environments. Satisfies requirement for Cultural Anthropology and Gender and Women’s Studies Concentrations.

Social Science or Language/Global Issues

Prerequisite: GDS 100 Introduction to Gender and Women’s Studies or ANT 200 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, or permission of instructor.



ANT 415 – Subcultures 4cr

This course surveys different contemporary and recent subcultures through the lens of various modes of social analysis in order to appreciate the diversity of our society and to examine issues such as power, class, gender, sexuality, and resistance. Students read and discuss texts that focus on youth culture, gender, alternative religious movements, and alternative forms of sexuality and kinship, among other topics. Students complete a major ethnographic paper based on original, hands-on research. Satisfies requirement for Cultural Anthropology Concentration.

Social Science or College Composition II

Prerequisites: ANT 200 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology and junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.



ANT 431-435 – Topics in Latin American Anthropology 2cr

Each time this course is taught, it addresses a different issue or event that receives a great deal of attention in contemporary Latin American anthropology. Students explore the topic in depth, using current anthropological journals and recent books in a seminar format. Recent topics have included “Politics of Indigenous Culture in Latin America,” “Gender Identity in Latin America,” “Scandal and Controversy in Latin American Anthropology,” “Native Peoples of Oaxaca,” “Mayan Ethnohistory.” May be repeated for credit as long as the topic has changed. Satisfies requirement for Cultural Anthropology Concentration.

Partially satisfies Social Science or Language/Global Issues

Prerequisite: ANT 105 Survey of Latin America, ANT 200 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, or ANT 241 Native Peoples of Mexico and Guatemala.



ANT 479 – Supervised Internship 1-16cr

The internship is a supervised work experience in an approved setting. One academic credit may be earned for each 40 hours of work in the internship placement.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and departmental approval, prior to registration, of a written proposal that describes in detail the activities and educational objectives of the intern. Application materials may be obtained from Anthropology faculty members or the Social Sciences Department Chair.

Course meets Triad Education Program Requirement in specified area.