Global Studies



Global Studies (GBL) Courses of Study

Link to Global Studies Courses



3.2.10.1

Program Overview

The mission of the Global Studies Program is to prepare students to be responsible citizens of the world by challenging them to understand contemporary global issues, address the historical and geographical contexts of global inequalities, and engage research agendas from an interdisciplinary perspective that integrates the humanities, the social sciences, and environmental studies.

The goals of the Global Studies Program are the following:

  1. To help students develop an integrated understanding of global issues from a multidisciplinary perspective.
  2. To provide opportunities for students to engage with a culture outside their own.
  3. To provide students with the tools needed to critically examine their own local and regional culture and how it is shaped by an increasingly globalized society.
  4. To prepare students for a globalized world through the study of a language other than English.
  5. To provide students with research and writing skills that promote critical thought and the effective communication of ideas.


3.2.10.2

Major in Global Studies

Grades: Students must earn a GPA of 2.0 in courses counting toward the major.

Total Credit Hours: Students must earn a minimum of 48 credit hours toward the Global Studies Major requirements. Of the 48 total credit hours, at least 16 must be upper level credit hours (including the 4-credit capstone thesis seminar).

General Requirements:

  1. Core Courses (12 credit hours): All Global Studies majors must pass the following three courses in order to complete the major:
    1. GBL 117 Introduction to Global Studies *
    2. GBL 305 Thinking Globally: Contemporary Globalization in Context
    3. GBL 461 Global Studies Seminar

    *This course provides an introduction to globalization and global studies and should be taken early in the major. Majors must complete this course before enrolling in GBL 305 or GBL 461.

  2. Foundation Courses (16 credit hours): All majors must take 16 credit hours from the following list of foundation courses.
    1. GBL 125 Introduction to Appalachian Studies
    2. ANT 261 Cultures of Sub-Saharan Africa
    3. HIS 111 East Asian Civilization
    4. MUS 112 Music Cultures of the World
    5. PAX 110 Introduction to Peace and Justice Studies
    6. SOC 251 Societies of Southeast Asia
  3. Thematic Concentration Courses (20 credits): Students must choose from one of four thematic concentrations. Detailed descriptions of these concentrations are listed below.
  4. Off Campus Experience: The Global Studies major stresses the importance of experiential education. To this end, all students must complete part of their education away from the Warren Wilson College campus. This component of the major varies depending on student interest and is arranged in conjunction with the student’s academic advisor. These experiences may range from a term or semester studying in a foreign country, to a short Warren Wilson international programs course, to an internship or extended service project. This component of the major should be planned well in advance. No credit is given for “prior learning.” This requirement should be met prior to the student’s senior year and must be met prior to the student’s last semester before graduation.
  5. Language Proficiency Requirement: For this major, proficiency is defined as the equivalent of three semesters of college level study. Proficiency can be gained at Warren Wilson College, before students arrive at WWC, or through study at other institutions or in other countries.

Program Proposal: Advanced planning with a Global Studies advisor is essential to successful and timely completion of all the major requirements. A written Global Studies major proposal must be approved by the Global Studies faculty and should be submitted to the advisor and to the Chair of Global Studies for approval no later than one month before registration during the second semester of the sophomore year or, for transfer students, during the first term of the junior year.



3.2.10.3

Thematic Concentrations



3.2.10.3.1 – Culture, Power, and Place

This concentration explores globalization’s impact on customs and institutions, as well as how such developments relate to contested notions of identity, place, and nation.

  1. Requirements: 20 total credits, 8 of which must be at 300-level or above. 4 credit hours from a different thematic concentration may be substituted with permission of the department.
    1. ANT 380 Gender in Cross-cultural Perspective
    2. ANT 415 Subcultures
    3. ENG 347 Colonial and Postcolonial Literature
    4. ANT 311 Culture and Religion
    5. ANT 431-435 Topics in Latin American Anthropology (2 credits)
    6. ECO 307 International Trade
    7. SOC/GDS 310 Media and Social Inequality
    8. GBL 331 The Cold War, Globalization, and Popular Culture
    9. GBL 379 Identifying Appalachia
    10. GBL 381 Filming Appalachia
    11. INT 316 Medieval Islamic Cultures
    12. LAN 352 Latin American Cinema
    13. PAX 326 Human Rights
    14. PSC 259 Comparative Government: Global South
    15. PSC 330 Politics of Developing States
    16. REL 238 History and Literature of Buddhism
    17. SOC 317 Social Theory
    18. THR 281 World Cinema
    19. WRI 220 Writing about Place
    20. Selected Special Topics courses with permission of the department


3.2.10.3.3 – Peace and Social Justice

This concentration considers the roles of peace, war, and justice in the era of globalization.

  1. Requirements: 20 total credits, 8 of which must be at 300-level or above. 4 credit hours from a different thematic concentration may be substituted with permission of the department.
    1. ECO 383 Economic Growth and Development
    2. ENG 280 Literature and War
    3. SOC/GDS 324 Social Inequality
    4. GBL 331 The Cold War, Popular Culture, and Globalization
    5. HIS 340 Conflict and Community in Early America
    6. PAX 230 Freedom and Dissent
    7. PAX 281 Humanitarian Law (2 credits)
    8. PAX 320 Palestine Question
    9. PAX 325 Resolving Conflict: Local and Global
    10. PAX 326 Human Rights
    11. PAX 327 Environmental Justice: Peace or Conflict
    12. PSC 257 International Relations
    13. PSC 336 US Foreign Policy
    14. REL 213 Religion and Environmental Justice
    15. REL 310 Race, Morality, and the Politics of Crime
    16. REL 321 Religion, Peace, and Social Justice: Seminar
    17. Selected Special Topics courses with permission of the department


3.2.10.3.4 – The Local and the Global

This concentration investigates contemporary Appalachia in comparative, interdisciplinary, and global frameworks.

  1. Requirements: 20 total credits, 8 of which must be at 300-level or above. 4 credit hours from a different thematic concentration may be substituted with permission of the department.
    1. ANT 139 Native Americans of the Southeast
    2. ANT 340 Archaeological Field School
    3. BIO 102 Field Natural History
    4. ENS 233 Forest Biology
    5. ENS 227 Geology of the Southern Appalachians (2 credits)
    6. GBL 379 Identifying Appalachia: Politics of Identity in the Appalachian Mountains
    7. GBL 381 Filming Appalachia
    8. HIS 251 Appalachian History
    9. MUS 232 Appalachian Music & Dance
    10. MUS 389 Traditions of Work & Music in the Southern Mountains
    11. WRI 220 Writing About Place
    12. Selected Special Topics courses with permission of the department


3.2.10.4

Minors in Global Studies



3.2.10.4.1 – Global Studies

Grades: Students must earn a minimum GPA of 2.0 in courses counting toward the Global Studies minor.

Requirements: 24 credit hours with a minimum GPA of 2.0, distributed in the following manner:

  1. The following course (4 credit hours):
    1. GBL 117 Introduction to Global Studies
  2. Foundation Courses: Select 8 credit hours from the following courses:
    1. GBL 125 Introduction to Appalachian Studies
    2. ANT 261 Cultures of Sub-Saharan Africa
    3. HIS 111 East Asian Civilization
    4. MUS 112 Music Cultures of the World
    5. PAX 110 Introduction to Peace and Justice Studies
    6. SOC 251 Societies of Southeast Asia
  3. Thematic Courses: 12 credit hours from any one Thematic Concentration (Culture, Power, and Place; Environment and Society; Peace and Social Justice; and The Local and the Global) as listed in the major requirements.


3.2.10.4.2 – Global Studies: Appalachian Studies

Grades: Students must earn a minimum GPA of 2.0 in courses counting toward the Global Studies: Appalachian Studies minor.

Requirements: A minimum of 24 credit hours from the following, with a minimum GPA of 2.0

  1. The following course:
    1. GBL 125 Introduction to Appalachian Studies
  2. At least 8 credit hours from the following:
    1. GBL 379 Politics of Identity in the Appalachian Mountains
    2. GBL 381 Filming Appalachia
    3. HIS 251 Appalachian History
    4. MUS 232 Appalachian Music & Dance
    5. MUS 389 Traditions of Work & Music in the Southern Mountains
    6. Selected Special Topics courses with permission of the separtment
  3. At least 12 credit hours from the following:
    1. ANT 139 Native Americans of the Southeast
    2. ANT 340 Archaeological Field School
    3. BIO 102 Field Natural History
    4. ENS 233 Forest Biology
    5. WRI 220 Writing About Place
    6. Selected Special Topics courses with permission of the separtment


3.2.10.4.3 – Global Studies: Applied Geospatial Technology

Grades: Students must earn a minimum GPA of 2.0 in courses counting toward the Global Studies: Applied Geospatial Technology minor.

Requirements: 24 credit hours with a minimum GPA of 2.0, distributed in the following manner:

  1. All of the following courses:
    1. MAT 141 Statistics
    2. 	OR
    3. MAT 253 Statistics for Natural Sciences
    4. MAT 201 Computer Science I
    5. MAT 202 Computer Science II
    6. GBL 225 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
    7. GBL 325 Advanced GIS
    8. GBL 499 Independent Study (4 credits required)