History and Political Science Department Faculty

 

Philip L. Otterness

Phone: 828.771.3733
Email: pottern@warren-wilson.edu
Office: Jensen 310

Education:
Ph.D. in History, University of Iowa
M.A. in International Relations, Johns Hopkins University
M.A. in History, Cambridge University
M.S. in Education, University of Pennsylvania
B.A. in History, University of Pennsylvania

Courses:
HIS 120 Western Civilization: Ancient Greece to 1450
HIS 270 Modern German History (taught every other year)
HIS 327 Renaissance and Reformation (taught every other year)
HIS 328 England since 1603 (taught every other year)
HIS 340 Conflict and Community in Early America (taught every other year)
HIS 480 Senior Seminar in History and Political Science
PSC 257 International Relations
PSC 258 Comparative Government of Industrialized States

Book:

Becoming German: The 1709 Palatine Migration to New York. Cornell University. Press, 2004. Winner of the Dixon Ryan Fox Prize for the best manuscript on New York State History in 2003.

Articles:

“Versprochenes Land: The 1710 Palatine Migration to New York” in Pfälzer in Amerika, Atlantische Akademie, Kaiserslautern, forthcoming.

“The 1709 Palatine Migration and the Formation of German Immigrant Identity in London and New York,” Explorations in Early American Culture, 3 (1999), 8-23.

“The New York Naval Stores Project and the Transformation of the Poor Palatines, 1710-1712,” New York History, 75 (April 1994), 133-54.

Co-author of “The Negotiation of Suspension and Settlement Agreements in Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Cases” in Transnational Commercial and Trade Litigation: Recent Developments (Philadelphia: ALI-ABA, 1986).

Co-author of “The ABCs of American Trade Laws on Foreign Dumping and Subsidies,” Business America, 9:25 (December 8, 1986), 4-8.

Book reviews:

Independent Immigrants: A Settlement of Hanoverian Germans in Western Missouri by Robert Frizzell. American Historical Review, 113 (April 2008), 1560.

Asylum for Mankind: America 1607-1800 by Marilyn Baseler. Perspectives on Political Science, 28 (Fall 1999), 220.

Palatine Roots by Nancy Dixon. New York History, 75 (October 1994), 424-425.

Invited lectures and keynote addresses:

The Wendell Tripp Lecture in New York State History. “What’s Elvis Got to Do with It? New York’s Colonial Legacy” delivered at the Conference on New York State History, Syracuse, June 2005.

“Versprochenes Land: Ansiedlungsprojekte in den USA.” delivered at Pfälzer in Amerika Conference, Kaiserslautern, Germany, June 12, 2009.

“The Palatines of New York: First Arrivals as Exemplars and Exceptions” delivered at the Conference on German-Speaking People in the Greater Mid-Atlantic Region, Johannes Gutenberg Universität, Mainz, Germany, October 8, 2009.

Conference and seminar papers:

“The 1709 Palatine Migration and the Formation of German Immigrant Identity.” Seminar of the McNeil Center for Early American Studies, Philadelphia, December 1997, and the Maryland University-Georgetown University Colonial History Seminar, December 1997.

“The ‘Poor Palatines’ of 1709: The Origins and Characteristics of an Early Modern Mass Migration.” International Seminar on the History of the Atlantic World, 1500-1800, Harvard University, September 1996.

“German Identity in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World.” Annual Conference of the Institute of Early American History and Culture, Boulder, May 1996.

“The Naval Stores Project of 1710-12 and the Transformation of the Poor Palatine Refugees.” Conference on New York State History, Brooklyn College, June 1994.