Pew Learning Center and Ellison Library

Social Work



Welcome to the library web pages for Social Work! 

This site should be a good start for your research in all your Social Work classes. 
If you need help, go to the librarian at the reference desk or feel free to contact me.
My office is on the lower level of the library.  You can also reach me by phone or email: 

Chris Nugent  (nugent@warren-wilson.edu, extension 3061)
Catalog

For All Classes

FYS 125:  Generation Gap:  Multigenerational Prspectives on Life

SWK 201:  Introduction to Social Work
SWK 202:  Skills of Helping Others
SWK 210:  History of Social Work and Social Welfare
SWK 291:  International Social Services and Social Work
SWK 293:  Eco-Social Sustainability
SWK 305:  Human Behavior and the Social Environment I:  The Life Course
SWK 306:  Human Behavior and Social Environment II
SWK 310:  Social Welfare Policies and Services
SWK 320:  Social Work Practice I
SWK 420:  Social Work Practice II
SWK 425:  Field Orientation Seminar
SWK 435:  Field Seminar

Professional Links


You will need to use this section for all classes

Ever wondered what all that library lingo means?

For a list of library and research words (such as citation, primary source, copyright, database etc.) go to the Glossary of Library Lingo, put together by Hunter Library at Western Carolina University.

For a refresher on how to do library research

go to  Painless Library Research

To evaluate what you find on the Web

go to Evaluating Web Resources  (from Widener University).  Look in the left-hand column under "evaluate web pages" for relevant links.
A fun way to learn this is using the The Internet Detective. Give it a try!

To recognize and avoid plagiarism

work with these sites:
Plagiarism, its nature and consequences (from Duke University Libraries)
Plagiarism, what it is and how to recognize and avoid it (from Indiana University)

To get instructions for citing in APA style

use the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, located in the library reference section (R 808.06615 P976 2001)
or connect to a page from Duke University Libraries that shows you how to cite a variety of materials, using  APA Style.
For an even simpler approach, use the  Landmark Citation Machine.

To find books

connect to the library homepage and choose Books, Videos and CDs at the top of the list.  Then select MCLN Catalog.
Also search for online books.  The link is right below the MCLN Catalog link.

If we do not have the books you need, look in WorldCat for books anywhere in the world.  The link is located below the link to ebooks.

To find journal articles

use one or several of our 150 databases. You can see them on the  library homepage by selecting Articles and Databases. 
Which ones will work best for you depends on your topic.  A librarian can also help you with selecting the ones best suited for your research needs.

To get books and journal articles from other libraries

use our Interlibrary Loan Service.  It works like this:

Go to the library homepage
Choose Library Services, then Interlibrary Loan.  You will find two request forms, one for books and the other for journal articles.
Ask a librarian for help the first time you fill out one of these.

Note that it may take one week or longer for the materials to get here. 
Also, make sure you do not have any overdue books or outstanding fines.  Everything must be cleared up before interlibrary loan requests are processed.

To write literature reviews

From The New Social Worker Online
Considerations in Writing a Literature Review

Columbia University Writing Center Handouts

Social Work Literature Review Guidelines from Purdue University

"How to Write a Paper (Literature Review) for a Social Science Course" by Dennis H. Karpowitz

To locate a service learning opportunity

www.handsonasheville.org


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SWK 201:  Introduction to Social Work

These resources may be helpful for the Scavenger Hunt

http://www.naswdc.org/
http://www.cswe.org
http://www.naswnc.org
http://www.dhhs.state.nc.us
http://www.socialworker.com


To find the Social Work section in the library:

Social Work researchers and practitioners draw on their own and many related disciplines for their work.  For example, books in education, psychology, sociology, and the health sciences are important information sources.  Those are located in various places in the library and you will learn how to locate them through the online catalog.
In most cases you will use the catalog to locate materials on subjects of interest or to see if we own a particular title.

For this exercise, however, you are asked to find the area on the lower level of the library where Social Work books are located.
Ask a librarian or look at the large yellow poster by the reference desk.
Find Social Problems & Social Services (360) and then find the section downstairs.

To find wether we have access to a specific Social Work journal:

Connect to the Library Home Page  and choose the link Magazines and Journals.  Next, select WWC Periodicals Holdings.
Type in the search box the journal title you are looking for.
The system will let you know if we have access, in what format, and for what years.

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SWK 202:  Skills of Helping Others

Syllabus, fall 2008

Schedule, fall 2008
These resources will help you with the Personal Change Project:

Examples of authoritative information sources where you can find definitions and background on behaviors and conditions are listed below.  All are located in the reference section of the library.  If you are not sure where that is ask a librarian.

The Encyclopedia of Social Work (R 361.003 E56 1995)
Social Work Dictionary (R 361.303 B255s 2003)
The Social Worker's Desk Reference (361.32 S678)

Encyclopedia of Psychology  (R 150.3 E56 2000)
Handbook of Psychology  (R 150 H236 2003)
Magill's Encyclopedia of Social Science Psychology  (R150.3 M194 2003)
Psychologists' Desk Reference (R 616.89 P974 1998)

There are also handbooks on specific behaviors and conditions, such as

Drugs, Alcohol & Addictive Behavior (R 615.7803 E56 2001)
Drugs, Alcohol, and Tobacco:  Learning about Addictive Behavior  (this is an ebook.  Find it through our  the library homepage)
The Encyclopedia of Obesity and Eating Disorders (R 616.8526003 C344e 2000)
The Encyclopedia of Phobias, Fears, and Anxieties (R616.8522003 D637e 2000)

Should the behavior you are working on not be covered in any of these books, ask a librarian for help.

You will also need to find books on professional skills in social work for this class.
To do that, search the MCLN catalog (check the section for all classes, above, for how to do that).
Do a subject search.
Terms (subjects) that work are:

Social service handbooks manuals
Helping behavior
Counseling
Social work
Social service

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SWK 210:  History of Social Work and Social Welfare

Link to the Buncombe County Aging Plan (2008-2012) (download the plan from the website).
I.  The following resources will help you with the Champions of Social Justice Assignment (all except the last title are in the reference section of the library):

The Encyclopedia of Social Welfare History in North America (R 361.97 E56 2005)
A to Z of American Women Leaders and Activists
  (R 303.484 092273 H638 2002)
Rebels and Renegades:  A Chronology of Social and Political Dissent in the United States (R 303.848 H219R 2002)
Encyclopedia of Women Social Reformers (R 303.48403 R221e 2001)  This is anexcellent resource to identify reformers in countries other than the US and of races other than Caucasian
Encyclopedia of Social Work (R361.003 E56)
Encyclopedia of Activism and Social Justice (R303.484 E56 2007).

On Reserve:  Billups, J.O. (Ed.).  (2002).  Faithful angels:  Portraits of International Social Work Notables.

The Social Work History Station
Social Work History Links
Social Security Online
The New Deal Network.   This site offers many primary documents.
Progress and Reform: a Cyperhistory of Social Work's Formative Years 
Environmental Movement Timeline


The three databases below are available through the library (if you are trying to access these from off-campus, call the library @771-3035 for a password):

Women and Social Movements in the United States 1600-2000
Daily Life Through History 
The New York Times (historical) - for national and international news, with coverage back to the first issue in 1851.


II.  The following resources will help you with the Social Welfare Policy Power Point Presention and Annotated Bibliography Assignment:

For tips on developing a good power point presentation and on writing an annotated bibliography in APA format, see SWK 293.

Choosing a policy to analyze:

    You can peruse the government websites listed below, under Professional Links for the Social Worker to get ideas about policies of interest to you.
    An excellent source to consult is the CQ Researcher.
    Looking at the think tanks, advocacy organizations, and professional organizations listed under 3. below may also pique your interest for a particular topic.
    Or, do a preliminary search in a comprehensive, full-text database, such as
   
    Academic Search Premier
    Proquest Research Library
    Contemporary Women's Issues.

1. Description of social condition/problem:

    The CQ Researcher is an excellent resource.  It includes the background of issues and usually supplies a timeline.  You can then use events from the timeline to         search other sources for additional information.
    CQ Public Affairs Collection .  This is not quite as easy to use as the CQ Researcher,
    but it will give you the legislative history on many policies.
              
    Reference books are quite useful for introductory information on social problems!  They usually also include a historical perspective.
    We have them on homelessness, health care, AIDS, environmental health, and many other topics.
    A few examples are:

       Encyclopedia of Social Welfare History in North America (R361.97 E56 2005)
       International Encyclopedia of Social Policy (R361.61 I61 2006).  Look in the index under "USA."
       Encyclopedia of Social Work (R361.003 E56).
       Encyclopedia of American Social History (R301.0973 E56)
       International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences (R300.3 I61)
       Social Issues in America (R361.973 S678c 2006)


    Be sure to search our catalog for books on your topic.

      Use this excellent source, as well, when you look for how your issue has been portrayed in the past.
       The New York Times (historical)
          
       Your textbook recommends think tanks, advocacy organizations, and professional associations. Note that these foundations have political agendas.  Some are        liberal, others are conservative.  Read the section "about us" to find out.  Here are a few examples:

    Think Tanks

       The Brookings Institution
       The American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research
       The American Heritage Foundation
       The Hoover Institution at Stanford University
       The Urban Institute
       The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
       The Reason Foundation for Free Minds and Free Markets
       The Hudson Institute
       The Progressive Policy Institute
       The Economic Policy Institute:  Research for Broadly Shared Prosperity
       The Independent Sector

    Advocacy Organizations

       The National Urban Leage
       The NAACP
       The Children's Defense Fund 
       The National Organization for Women

    Professional Associations
      
       The American Medical Association
       The American Public Human Services Organization 
       The National Association of Social Workers
       The American Psychological Association

   You will also need statistics.

       Statistical Resources on the Web (from the University of Michigan Library)
       Columbia International Affairs Online
       FactSearch
       U.S. Census Bureau
       FedStats.gov
       NationMaster

       Or search any of the government sites listed under Professional Links for the Social Worker, below.
      
  2.    Policy description:
 
       CQ Public Affairs Collection
       Social Sciences Package.  Select Social Work Abstracts and the PAIS databases. 
       FindLaw for the Public
       Congressional Record
       Green Book of the House Committee on Ways and Means 
       THOMAS .  This site does similar things as the Congressional Record, but it is easier to use.

      Also search any of the government sites listed under Professional Links for the Social Worker, below.

Last but not least, you can find much information using Search Engines and Subject Directories. 
Use this link to access a number of them.

In addition, your texbook recommends:

       The Argus Clearinghouse
       Medical Matrix

You are welcome to use the meta-search engines listed in your textbook, but I would not recommend them.  They tend to return too much material.


III.  The following resources will help you with important background information and with  your literature review for your service learning project on Best Practices in Food Bank Food Drives:

Helpful Tips for Literature Reviews:

From The New Social Worker Online
Considerations in Writing a Literature Review

Columbia University Writing Center Handouts

Social Work Literature Review Guidelines from Purdue University

"How to Write a Paper (Literature Review) for a Social Science Course" by Dennis H. Karpowitz

Other sites you will need for this assignment:

MANNA Food Bank:  www.mannafoodbank.org (includes links to numerous websites relating to hunger)
America’s Second Harvest:  www.secondharvest.org  (see Learn about Hunger page which includes, among other helpful information, The 2007 Almanac of Hunger and Poverty
Food Research Action Center:  www.frac.org

Koch, K. (2000, December 22). Hunger in America. CQ Researcher, 10, 1033-1056. To retrieve, connect to the CQ Researcher and type <hunger in America> in the quick search box.


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SWK 291:  International Social Services and Social Work

For a thorough introduction to the topic of your class you can check out the books listed below.  They are downstairs in the Social Work section of the library.

International Social Work (361 C877i)
Social Welfare:  A World View (361 V285s)
Social Welfare in Global Context (361 M629s)

The following resources will help you with your portfolio assignement:

The organizations listed below deal with international social welfare issues:

Childs Right Information Network
Directory of Development Organizations
Directory of Humanitarian Organizations--find on ReliefWeb
Food for the Hungry:  World Crisis Network
InterAction --American Council for Voluntary International Action
ICSW: The International Council on Social Welfare
ICASO:  International Council of AIDS Service Organizations
Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS
Netaid--"Join the fight against poverty."
OECD:  Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Division for Social Policy and Development
UNHCR:  The UN Refuge Agency
UNICEF:  The United Nations Children's Fund
United Nations Development Programme
World Health Organisation Media Centre
GlobalHealth.gov


You can find excellent information about your country through these library resources:

CountryWatch
Statesman's Yearbook Online
Countries and their Cultures (from the Gale Virtual Reference Library)

To find information in newspapers:

New York Times - for national and international news
Historical New York Times - for national and international news, with coverage back to the first issue in 1851.

To find periodical articels:

Connect to any of these databases

Academic Search Premier
MasterFILE Premier
Proquest Research Library
Contemporary Women's Issues
Social Sciences Package.  Select Social Work Abstracts.

or ask a librarian to help you find others that suit your topic.

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SWK 293:  Eco-Social Sustainability

As you prepare your critical reflection papers, review these sites.  They will help you determine the scholarly qualities of the articles you are examining.

From Painless Library ResearchIs it a Scholarly Journal? 
Scholarly vs. Popular Information, from the Internet Navigator at the University of Utah.

For the required web site evaluation [http://www.sric.org/uranium/index.htmlhttp://www.dsni.orghttp://www.hacbed.org/ ] review the site prepared by Widener University, Evaluating Web Resources.

For the Eco-Social Sustainability Power Point Presentation and Annotated Bibliography you are asked to research an eco-social sustainability issue of particular interest to you.

For tips on writing an annotated bibliogrpahy in APA format, see:

http://library.umcrookston.edu/annotate.htm
http://www.library.cornell.edu/olinuris/ref/research/skill28.htm

For tips on developing a good Power Point presentation, see:

http://www.microsoft.com/office/previous/xp/columns/column08.asp
http://www.microsoft.com/smallbusiness/resources/technology/business_software/presenting_with_powerpoint_10_dos_and_donts.mspx

Here are a few ideas for how to get started on the research:

1.  Search the library's catalog for books and ebooks (first link on page), using the subject term environmental justice

2.  Find scholarly journal articles.  The following databases will get you started:
Social Services Abstracts (a new database, just for Social Work!)  http://www-ca1.csa.com/ids70/select_databases.php?SID=22feeb6a1dff6253115b16ba5d60d33a
Proquest Research Library
JSTOR
Ethnic News Watch 

3.  Peruse the following high-quality eco-social sustainability web sites:

Environmental Justice Resources on the World Wide Web, maintained by the working Group on Environmental Justice at Harvard University
Enviro-Health Links from the National Library of Medicine, National Institute of Health
Environmental Justice, maintained by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration.

Readings available online

Prugh, T. & Assadourian, E. (2003). What is sustainability, anyway? World Watch, 16(5), 10-21.
http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?index=14&did=417817251&SrchMode=3&sid=1&Fmt=4&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1169132592&clientId=15083&aid=1

United Nations (1948). The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

International Federation of Social Workers “Ethics in Social Work, Statement of Principles”
 
People of Color Environmental Leadership Summit “Principles of Environmental Justice”

Kallstrom, H.N. & Ljung, M. (2005). Social sustainability and collaborative learning. Ambio, 34(4/5), 376-382.
http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?index=24&did=892469671&SrchMode=3&sid=1&Fmt=4&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1169065248&clientId=15083&aid=1

Rees, W.E.  (2002). An ecological economics perspective on sustainability and prospects for ending poverty. Population and Environment, 24(1), 15-46. 
http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?index=1&did=230657141&SrchMode=3&sid=2&Fmt=3&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1169065434&clientId=15083&aid=2

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SWK 305:  Human Behavior and the Social Environment I:  The Life Course

Syllabus

Service Commitment and Confidentiality form

Live Story and Mentor Contract form

Sheri Berenbaum article

Mercedes Bern-Klug et. al. article

For the Website Review assignment, you may want to review the site prepared by Widener University, Evaluating Web Resources.

Here are the sites you are asked to review:


Click here for a great overview of  Erik Erikson's Personality Theory


For your journal review assignment, start with the databases listed below.

These are big, full-text databases that cover all subjects.  You must specify that you want to retrieve only peer-reviewed, scholarly articles.  You will receive results from a variety of journals.  Look at the title of the journal to make sure it is a social work journal or a journal from a related field.

Academic Search Premier
Proquest Research Library
MasterFILE Premier

Now proceed with JSTOR , the scholarly archive.  This database covers recent and old materials both.  It does not cover the most current three to five years.  There is no category for Social Work, but you can select several related subject areas to receive good results.

Lastly, find the Social Work Abstracts on the last shelf of the reference section in the library.  This is the standard professional index for Social Work.  One nice feature is its list of Social Work journals in the front.
Here are a few pointers on how to use it:
    There is a bound volume for each year.  You should probably search through at least three years.  Each volume as an annual index in the back.  This is were you     find your subjects.  You then turn to the page number indicated where you will find an abstract of the article.
    To find the full text, go to the Library Home Page and click on the link WWC Periodicals Holdings.  Type in the search box the title of the journal and let the             system tell you if it is available in our library.
Please feel free to ask a librarian for help with this process!

A quick reminder:  For help with citing your articles go to APA Style.  If your articles are available in full-text on the web, be sure to cite them as such.

Miscellaneous assignments:

You will need the following webpages:
Ecomap
Genogram
Timeline

Oral History Paper assignment: 

You will need to locate five peer-reviewed sources for this assignment.  Scholarly is another term used for peer-reviewed materials.  Books as well as journals can be scholarly/peer-reviewed.

To locate journal articles:
Select the Articles and Databases  link on the library homepage.  Some databases allow you to limit your results to peer-reviewed or scholarly articles.  If this is not possible, either search specifically for an article in a social work journal or
consult the site,  Is it a Scholarly Journal? to help you determine whether what you found is scholarly/peer-reviewed.

To locate scholarly books, go to our catalog (first link on page).  Do a subject or keyword search.  Look at the list of items you get.  A book published by a university press is most likely scholarly.  A book with an editor and contributions by individual authors could also be scholarly.  To be sure locate the book in the stacks and see who the author is.  Another indication of scholarly are footnotes or endnotes and a bibliography.

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SWK 306:  Human Behavior and Social Environment II

For your journal reviews assignment, start with the databases listed below.

These are big, full-text databases that cover all subjects.  You must specify that you want to retrieve only peer-reviewed, scholarly articles.  You will receive results from a variety of journals.  Look at the title of the journal to make sure it is a social work journal or a journal from a related field.

Academic Search Premier
Proquest Research Library
MasterFILE Premier

Now proceed with JSTOR , the scholarly archive.  This database covers recent and old materials both.  It does not cover the most current three to five years.  There is no category for Social Work, but you can select several related subject areas to receive good results.

Lastly, find the Social Work Abstracts on the last shelf of the reference section in the library.  This is the standard professional index for Social Work.  One nice feature is its list of Social Work journals in the front.
Here are a few pointers on how to use it:
    There is a bound volume for each year.  You should probably search through at least three years.  Each volume as an annual index in the back.  This is were you     find your subjects.  You then turn to the page number indicated where you will find an abstract of the article.
    To find the full text, go to the Library Home Page and click on the link WWC Periodicals Holdings Type in the search box the title of the journal and let the             system tell you if it is available in our library.
Please feel free to ask a librarian for help with this process!

A quick reminder:  For help with citing your articles go to APA Style.  If your articles are available in full-text on the web, be sure to cite them as such.

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SKW 310:  Social Welfare Policies and Services

To be developed when syllabus is available

Possible links:

Influencing State Policy (http://www.statepolicy.org/keep_up.html)

Policy Researcher Tutorial from the University of Michigan (http://www.lib.umich.edu/socwork/rescue/pgtc.html)

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SWK 320:  Social Work Practice I

For your Values/Ethics Journal Review & Presenation assignment you will have to identify a variety of types of sources in a bibliography before you can find the materials in the library or online.
Here are examples of how different materials look in a bibliography.  All examples are from the Duke University Library site on how to cite materials.  Also included are instructions for how to find out if we have a particular item.

This is a book
Sennett, R., & Cobb, J. (1972). The hidden injuries of class. New York:
Vintage Books.

Do we have it?
Go to our catalog
(first link on page) and do an author or a title search.

This is an ebook.
Norman, R. (1998).  The moral philosophers.  New York: Oxford 
University Press. Retrieved August 14, 2001, from Duke University, Duke University                  Libraries, netLibrary Web site: http://www.netlibrary.com.

Do we have it?
Go to our catalog (first link on page) and do an author or a title search.  If it does not appear there go to our NetLibrary collection and search again.

This is an article in a book
Cassel, J., &  Zambella, B. (1996). Without a net: Supporting ourselves in
a tremulous atmosphere.  In T. W. Leonhardt (Ed.),  "LOEX" of
    the West: Teaching and learning in a climate of constant change 
(pp. 75-92). Greenwich, CT: JAI Press Inc.
Holton, W. (1994).

Do we have it?
Look in our catalog
(first link on page) for the title of the book (not the title of the article).  The title is "LOEX" of the West.
If we do not have it check WorldCat.  If the title shows up there you can obtain it through Interlibrary Loan.

This is a journal article, retrieved from the JSTOR database.
The Ohio Indians and the coming of theAmerican Revolution in Virginia. The Journal of Southern
History, 60, 453-478. Retrieved July 31, 2001, from JSTOR         database.

Do we have it?
You need to look if we subscribe to the journal.  To do that choose the Magazines and Journals  on the library's homepage and then select WWC Holdings.  Type the journal title in the search box.  If we have it you will get a number of databases where the title is covered. 


This is a journal article from a paper journal (not online).
Brown,  E. (1996). The lake of seduction: Silence, hysteria, and the space of feminist
theatre. JTD: Journal of Theatre and Drama, 2, 175-200.


Do we have it?
You need to look if we subscribe to the journal.  To do that choose the Magazines and Journals  on the library's homepage and then select WWC Holdings.  Type the journal title in the search box.  If we have it you will get a number of databases where the title is covered.  The system will also tell you if we subscribe to this title in paper.

This is a web site.
National Park Service. (2003, February  11). Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Site. Retrieved February 13, 2003,
    from http://www.nps.gov/abli/

Can you get access to it?
The first thing to try is of course the URL.  Depending on when the site was accessed this may or may not be successful.  If the URL no longer works try an advanced Google search, using keywords from the title or the entire title.

This is a government document. 
Hate Crimes Prevention Act of 1998: Hearing before the
Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, 105th Cong., 2nd sess. 1 (1998).

Do we have it?
Your best bet to find this is the THOMAS service by the Library of Congress.
You may also be lucky with an advanced
Google search.


For the Treatment Models Teach-In assignment you can use, in addition to your textbook, The Social Worker's Desk Reference, available in the library reference section (R361.32 S678), for further information on your treatment model.

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SWK 420:  Social Work Practice II

For the Macro Social Issues Debates assignment you will need to find books, journal articles, newspaper articles, interviews, and other appropriate resources on your topic.  Here are some pointers:

Books:  search our catalog (MCLN), ebooks, and WorldCat.  You find all of the links on the library homepage.

Journal articles
:  Go to the Articles & Databases link on the library homepage and select several databases to search.  Recommended databases include  Academic Search Premier
Proquest Research Library
JSTOR
Social Sciences Index
PsycArticles
PsycInfo
Alternative Press Index
Also, do not forget to search Social Work Abstracts, available in the reference section of the library.

Newspaper articles:  A few possibilities for this are
The New York Times
Any U.S. newspaper fround trough Newsbank
Our local paper, the Asheville Citizen-Times
A local paper with an alternative perspective, the Asheville Global Report

Interviews
One way to find published interviews on the web is to do an advanced Google search, using your issue and the words interview or interviews.

For the Social Stratification Book Review assignment you will need to find biographical information on the author of your book.
You can use the Biographical Resource Center
The American National Biography
or, of course, Google.

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SWK 425:  Field Orientation Seminar

For your resume you may want to review these resources:

Social Work Resumes from Fried Socialworker.com. 

A sample Social Work resume, offered by Smith College. http://www.smith.edu/cdo/handouts/social-work-resume.pdf

Social Work Quickstart Resume Templates from Collegegrad.com.

For the Reflection assignment you will need:  CSWE Educational Policies and Accreditation Standards (EPAS).

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SWK 435:  Field Seminar

No new resources needed.

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Professional Links for the Social Worker

Books in our library:

Social Work Career Development (361.3202373 D651s)
An Author's Guide to Social Work Journals (R808.066361 A664 1997).  This source is for those who want to publish in a social work journal.

Resources from the National Association of Social Workers (NASW):

National Association of Social Workers
Code of Ethics of the National Association of Social Workers 
NASW professional development page
NASWJobLink:  The Social Work Career Center 

Information for Practice Resources:

The IP (Information for Practice) Archives are an excellent resource for
up to date peer-reviewed published research related to many fields of
social sciences including global studies, social welfare, women's/gender
studies, sociology, psychology, mental health, and on and on...

http://www.nyu.edu/socialwork/ip/

and the archives may be found at:
http://www.nyu.edu/socialwork/ip/archives.php

Resources collected by Arizona State University Fletcher Library:

Social Work Associations
Newsletter for Social Workers
"Free" Reports for Social Workers

Staying informed:

Information for practice:  news and new scholarship from around the world, maintained by Gary Holden at New York University, helps you stay abreast of the profession.  The site provides the table of contents of many professional journals, but access to the full text of the articles is available only for a fee.  If you do not have access to a research library this is an excellent way get to the research literature.

Government resources:

These authoritative sites are kept up to date by the government agencies responsible for them.  They offer resources and programs available to individuals and service providers. Some also  include grant information.  Several of these sites are excellent sources of research information.

Administration for Children and Families from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
Bureau of the Census.
Bureau of Justice Statistics from the U.S. Department of Justice.
Bureau of Labor Statistics from the U.S. Department of Labor.
Centers for Disease Control from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
Center for Substance Abuse Prevention from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.
Center for Substance Abuse Treatment from the same administration as the previous site.
Child Support Enforcement from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families.
Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). This is the largest grant-making agency in the federal government, providing some 60,000 grants per year.  DHHS also handles the Medicare program.
Federal Emergency Management Agency.
Maternal and Child Health Bureau from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
The National Criminal Justice Reference Service. The NCJRS is a collection of clearinghouses supporting all bureaus of the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs:  the National Institute of Justice, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the Bureau of Justice Assistance, the Office for Victims of Crime, and the Office of National Drug Control Policy.
National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism from the National Institute of Health.
National Institute of Drug Abuse. This entity supports over 85 percent of the world's research on the health aspect of drug abuse and addiction.  This is an excellent site to retrieve scientific data.
National Institute of Health.
National Institute of Justice is the research agency of the U.S. Department of Justice.
National Institute of Mental Health is the foremost mental health research organization in the world.
National Library of Medicine. This site provides access to a couple of health-related databases such as Medline Plus, PubMed, NIH Senior Health, ClinicalTrials.gov, and TOXNET.
National Institute of Aging. This site offers a vast amount of research on aging.
PREVLINE:  Prevention Online. The National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI) is the world's largest repository of information on substance abuse prevention and policy.
Thomas--U.S. Congress on the Internet provides current U.S. federal legislative information, including bills, laws, Congressional Record, reports, and links to further information.

Resources for fund raising:

The Fundraising Manual from the I.U.C. Journal of Social Work offers a consice list of steps necessary for a successful fundraising campaign. 
Grants.etc., a site by Prof. Armand Lauffer that is hosted by the University of Michigan School of Social Work, provides a comprehensive how-to manual for grantseekers.
The Foundation Center offers many services for fundraisers, some of which are free.
idealist.org from Action Without Borders is a site where you can find non-profit agencies and foundations just about anywhere in the world.

To find government grants, try these sites:
GrantsNet from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
Grants.gov .  This site allows organizations to electronically find and apply for more than $400 billion in Federal grants.
The Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance from the U.S. Government, listing government grants available to individuals and organizations.

Staying connected with other social workers:

Social Work World offers a listserv, a blog, and numerous resources for aspiring and practicing social workers.  Give it a try!
Social Work Discussion Lists

Publishers in the social work field:

If you are looking to build a personal professional library, you may want to consult the publishers listed here.  The very comprehensive site is maintained by the University of Michigan Social Work Library.

Miscellaneous resources of interest:

Social Work Job Bank
HandsNet:  An Online Professional Community 
News from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services


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Page created and maintained by Chris Nugent, with input from the faculty in the Social Work Department.
Please contact any of us with suggestions, additions, etc.
Last updated:  January 27, 2009