ANT*105 Introduction to Latin America 4.0 Gen.Educ:Lang/Global Issues 1
  This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to 600 years of Latin American history and culture, with special emphasis on the contributions from indigenous and African peoples. Students will examine literature, geography, art, religion, and politics, always keeping in mind the relationship between the United States and the rest of the hemisphere. This course satisfies the Triad Education Social Science or Language/Global Issues course requirement.
ANT*139 Native Americans of the Southeast 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 1
  This course is a culture history that explores the Native American cultures of the southeastern United States through archaeology, ethnography, and ethnohistory. The class is designed as a survey course and will include major discussions of Native American prehistory (archaeology), the Contact period, ethnography and ethnohistory of the Colonial period, the Removal Era, and southeastern Native Americans in the 20th century. This course satisfies the Triad Education Social Science course requirement.
ANT*145 The Archaeology of World Cultures 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 1
  This is a survey of world prehistory from the time of our earliest known human ancestors five million years ago to the rise of state-level societies, as exemplified by the civilizations of ancient Mesopotamia and Mesoamerica. We explore cultural processes including the migration of our species throughout the world as hunter-gatherers, the beginning of settled life, and the evolution of cultural complexity with tribal and chiefly societies. This course satisfies the Triad Education Social Science course requirement.
ANT*146 Archaeological Methods 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 1
  An introduction to archaeological excavation and methods of artifact analysis. Students explore basic artifact identification, classification, and cataloging, and practice basic excavation methods during field exercises. The class will also study research designs in order to learn how these methods contribute to understanding current issues in Western North Carolina archaeology. May be repeated for credit as ANT147.
ANT*147 Archaelogical Methods 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 1
  An introduction to archaeological excavation and methods of artifact analysis. Students explore basic artifact identification, classification, and cataloging, and practice basic excavation methods during field exercises. The class will also study research designs in order to learn how these methods contribute to understanding current issues in western North Carolina archaeology. This course satisfies the Triad Education Social Science course requirement.
ANT*191 ST:Ethnohistory in Film 4.0 Social Sciences 1
  This course is designed to introduce students to the Ethno historical method for understanding and interpreting the past through the medium of film. Ethno history (also, Ethno archaeology) studies the emergence, transformation and nature of our world within the context of the past by using all available "trace" elements of human civilization. Trace elements of society can be divided into 4 basic categories: immaterial (institutions, customs, beliefs, or language); material (biological remains or physical artifacts); written texts (penned, print, or both: like a passport or report card); and representational (a "real" thing in itself, like a photograph or a song, but that is a representation of something else). All of these trace elements of society can be employed to tell a nuanced story about the past, and by extension inform future decisions. One of the most accessible ways to combine all of these elements into a single story and disseminate it in a clear manner is through film.
ANT*199 Independent Study in Anthropology 4.0   1
ANT*200 Intro.to Anthropology 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
  This course takes a cultural approach to anthropology in order to provide an appreciation for the diversity of the human experience and to relate culture to other concepts such as gender, religion, ecology, change, and power. The course will also closely examine a small number of case studies from distant lands and from the United States. This course satisfies the Triad Education Social Science course requirement.
ANT*237 Appalachian Folk Medicine:Plants & Healing Traditions 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
  Folk medicine topics such as Cherokee influences on early European immigrants, garden-grown herbs and wild plants, magic religious beliefs, and traditions associated with plant use are considered through field study, visits with contemporary healers, and a survey of printed resources. This course satisfies the Triad Education Social Sciences course requirement.
ANT*239 Physical Anthropology 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
  This course is an introduction to the general field of Physical Anthropology with a focus on human evolution and human physical variation. Course topics include primate studies and hominid evolution as well as the study of the dispersal of modern Homo sapiens across the globe. We will look at human biological variation with respect to culture to examine such ideas as the relationship between population characteristics and their environments adnthe effect of disease on differing populations. We will also examine the role of physical anthropology in archaeology and forensic science.
ANT*241 Native Peoples of Mexico and Guatemala 4.0 Gen.Educ:Lang/Global Issues 2
  This course takes a historical approach to investigate political, economic, religious and cultural developments in indigenous Mexico and Guatemala beginning with a brief survey of pre-Hispanic Mexico and Guatemala, continuing up to the present,and focusing on how indigenous cultures, forms of government, and religious practices developed as a complex process in situations of unequal power. This course satisfies the Triad Education Social Science or Language/Global Issues course requirement.
ANT*251 Latin America Archaeology 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
  PreReq: Sophomore standing
  This course is an introduction to the archaeology of Mesoamerica and South America. The class will study the history of Latin American archaeology and explore the broad range of human cultural history in these regions. The class will focus on Formative, Classic and Post-Classic cultural expressions with particular emphasis on the rise of complex societies in Mexico and in the Andean region. This course meets the Triad Education Social Science course requirement.
ANT*279 Supervised internship 1.0   3
  Variable credit: 1-16cr. The internship is a supervised work experience in an approved setting. One academic credit may be earned for each 40 hours of work in the internship placement. Prerequisite: Departmental approval, prior to registration, of a written proposal that describes in detail the activities and educational objectives of the intern. Application materials may be obtained from Anthropology faculty members or the Social Sciences Devision Chair.
ANT*290 ST:Cultures of Sub-Saharan Africa 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
  This course is a broad survey course covering the myriad cultures of sub-Saharan Africa. Students will become familiar with the geographic, historical, political and social landscapes of the region as well as some of its artistic, musical, and religious practices. The first part of the course will focus on sub-Saharan Africa's rich and complex colonial history, which will then lead us into examining the effects of colonization and modernization on the cultures of contemporary Africa.
ANT*291 ST:Global Food Industry & Its Countermovements 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
  In the context of a global food system, agriculture and food have emerged as contentious political issues, and counter-responses are emerging to challenge this system and industrialized agriculture. This course focuses on those challenges and will use the specific response that has emerged in Western North Carolina as a point of departure. This is an interdisciplinary course and will include perspectives drawn from anthropology, sociology, political science, geography, and other disciplines.
ANT*292 ST:Applied Anthropology of Development 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
  Applied Anthropology of Development introduces students to the application of social theory and ethnographic methodologies to address cultural, socio-economic, and political concerns involved in the transfer of knowledge among scientific researchers,government institutions, non-governmental organizations, and human populations in the United States and across the globe. The course includes a service component.
ANT*293 ST:Andean Archeaology 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
  This course will cover the prehistoric cultural chronology of Andean South America, from the earliest evidence of human presence, possibly as early 12,000 YBP on the southern tip of South America, to just before European colonization in the 15th century, and ending with the defeat of the Inca in what is modern-day Peru. Major themes of this course are: theories concerning human radiation throughout Andean South America; subsistence, sedentarization and domestication; agricultural intensification and the dynamic systems of population/environment interaction; settlement pattern analysis and artifact variation as they relate to the cultural chronology; strategies of cooperation and conflict; and socio-political formations of the "state" and "empire". This course will highlight many major archaeological sites of Andean South America from southern Chile to northern Columbia. We will discuss the importance of cultural traditions spatially as well as temporally, and at both local and regional scales. Much of the course will focus on sites found within the modern political borders of Peru. For example, Chavin is considered by many to be the cradle of Andean civilization. Moche is thought to be the first state-level society to develop in South America, and by several criteria, Wari, Chimu, and Inca were the only Imperial societies to form in South America; the major sites of all these cultures are found in Peru.
ANT*295 ST:Identity and Community 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
ANT*297 ST:Global Food Industry & Its Countermovements 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science  
  In the context of a global food system, agriculture and food have emerged as contentious political issues, and counter-responses are emerging to challenge this system and industrialized agriculture. This course focuses on those challenges and will use the specific response that has emerged in Western North Carolina as a point of departure. This is an interdisciplinary course and will include perspectives drawn from anthropology, sociology, political science, geography, and other disciplines.
ANT*299 IS:Independent Study 1.0    
ANT*311 Culture and Religion 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 3
  PreReq: ANT200 Intro.Anthropology
  This course will introduce students to both historical and current theoretical ideas and debates in the anthropology of religion and spirituality, discussing these theories in relation to specific ethnographic studies from around the world. The course will encourage students to examine religion and religious practices from a broad, cross-cultural perspective and will include a discussion of such practices as ritual, magic, witchcraft/sorcery, shamanism, and spirit possession. In addition we will examine the interrelations between religion and war, nationalism and globalization.
ANT*321 Traditional Agricultural Systems 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 3
  PreReq: Junior standing, or Permission of Instructor
  This course examines the origins of agriculture and agriculture's role in the evolution of cultural complexity. The course employs a cultural ecology and ecosystems approach, which considers agriculture as an integral part of the environment in which it is practiced (this includesthe cultural environment as well as physical environment). This course deals only with pre-industrial and, for the most part, non-commercial agricultural systems
ANT*338 Archaeology and the Environment 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 3
  This course explores the relationship or interaction between people and their environments through the disciplines of archaelology and anthropology. Among the topics that may be explored are "Garbology," Pleistocene extinctions, human domestication of plants and animals, climate and culture, and Native Americans and their environments. This course satisfies the Triad Education Social Science course requirement. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor.
ANT*340 Archaeological Field School 2.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 3
  PreReq: Permission of Instructor
  This is a summer field course involving archaeological excavation and survey in the Appalachian region. Excavations usually take place on prehistoric pre-Cherokee sites. Other types of prehistoric and historic sites may also be considered. The course includes instruction in excavating methodology, on-site excavation work, and classroom instruction in archaeological theory and the archaeology of the region. May be repeated for credit as ANT341.
ANT*378 World Wide Field Crs:Mexico 2.0 WWC Study Abroad  
  PreReq: Jr Standing,Permission of World Wide Offic
  This course deals with the history, language and culture of Turkey. Discussion includes the Ottoman period, the establishment of the Turkish Republic in 1923 and recent national developments. Two ethnographic studies written by the course professor will be read.One deals with a Turkish town; the other with a Turkish village. In addition, we will study the basic grammar and vocabulary of written and spoken Turkish. This course is designed to offer students a solid foundation in Turkish history and culture and basic Turkish in preparation for a two-week study stay in Turkey. The class will visit the major historic sites in Istanbul/Constantinople and visit the Turkish town and village studies in this course.
ANT*391 ST:Folklore &Mythology of Native Americans 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 3
  The interdisciplinary comparative study of American Indian narrative tradition within specific cultural context, with particular emphasis on Cherokee traditions. Examination of social, behavioral, and performance contexts foregrounds the diversity,richness, and social value of Native American imaginative expression. The wide content range includes materials from the Aniyvwiya (Cherokee), the Quiche Maya, the Anishinabe (Chippewa), the Dine (Navajo), and representative Pueblo and Pacific northwest coastal peoples. While the focus is on narrative traditions, spiritual and social systems, material culture traditions, and planting, healing, and burial practices are also examined as they relate to narrative performances. Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of instructor
ANT*392 ST:Anthropology of Religion 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science  
  This course will introduce students to both historical and current theoretical ideas in the anthropology of religion and spirituality, discussing these theories in religion to specific ethnographic studies from around the world. The course will encourage students to examine religion and religious practices from a broad, cross-cultural perspective and will include a discussion of such practices as magic, witchcraft and sorcery, shamanism, spirit possession, and ritual violence. Religion will be discussed as a human practice that has the potential to create peace and social cohesion as well as conflict and violence.
ANT*393 ST:Law, Culture and Society 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 3
  Law, Culture, and Society. The course will deal with the nature of law cross-culturally, focusing on its relationships with various forms of socioeconomic and political organization(e.g., band, tribe, chiefdom, state). The readings deal with various aspects of law, culture, and society in selected societies or countries, such as the Tiv in Africa, Kenya, an Indian village, Turkey, Gypsy, Eskimo, etc. The class will also attempt to conduct dispute resolution procedures in accordance with the judicial style of one or more non-Western societies. The course should be of value to anthropology, sociology, global studies, and political science majors/minors and any student interested in law.
ANT*394 ST:Globalization and Resistance 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 3
  This course explores the ways in which various forms of globalization are affecting people throughout the world. Much of the literature refers to economic globalization. This will be one focus of the course; we will also explore issues of globalization in reference to governance (democracy), the environment, and cultural values and beliefs. Within each of these four themes, we will read not only general commentary, but seek to understand in more depth the challenges facing a group or groups of local people (case studies within Appalachia or Mumbai, India, or Oaxaca, Mexico, etc.) and their responses to globalization. Readings are meant to convey some sense of optimism in the midst of global problems as we uncover some alternatives to globalization and explore the possibilities of pluralism.
ANT*395 ST:African Perspectives On Gender 2.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 3
  PreReq: ANT200 Intro.Anthropology
  This seminar will familiarize students with a variety of critical perspectives on gender in sub-Sarharan Africa. We will focus on how social constructions of gender shape relations of power between men and women in various African contexts. In particular, we will explore the social, historical, and political aspects of gender in such areas as ritual and performance, popular culture, sexuality, war and conflict, and the interrealtions between gender and space.
ANT*396 ST:Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 3
  The course will guide students through a critical examination of gender as both a social construct as well as a social and cultural practice in differing cross-culture contexts. We begin by examining how gender has been defined as a category of analysis with anthropology and how gendered experiences may affect anthropological fieldwork and research. We then go on to explore the connection between gender, identity and the body, as well as how gender plays out in the arenas of kinship, sexuality, ritual, and performance. In addition we will look at the role of gender in processes of nationalism and globalization and conclude with considerations of gender, power and resistance.
ANT*397 ST:Seminar in Public Archaeology 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 3
  Drawing on the fields of community organizing and development, conservation, restoration, curatorial sciences, archaeology, history and architecture, students will learn about federal and state-level cultural resource management (CMR) practices, international policies like UNESCO World Heritage designation, and focus directly on new and drastically more efficient models for preserving cultural heritage sites, both in the U.S. and abroad, through "community-based archaeology". First, by excavating the origin of Public Archaeology from Rescue Archaeology and Urban Archaeology projects funded by national governments in the wake of World War II, then by analyzing what works, what doesn't work, and the reasons why, this seminar will explore the theory and method driving cultural heritage management policy and practices today. Students in this course will communicate directly with public officials, resident populations, and professional archaeologists and historians about ongoing projects, and will be exposed to management and policy decisions in the "real world" of heritage protection.
ANT*398 ST:Prophecy, Utopia & Apocalypse 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 3
  To the messianic prophet, the inventor, the environmentalist, and so many others "the future" pervades and shapes the present moment, and vice versa. This course will explore some of the culturally constructed horizons that motivate socio-cultural action in the present. We will look at distinct notions of time, progress, technology, hope and fear, investment, planning, utopia and dystopia, world ending and world-renewal from various communities around the world. Readings that explore how discourses of "the future" have altered drastically over time will be supplemented with films that have significantly reconceptualized our tomorrows, e.g. Blade Runner. Students will write critical reading and film responses, annotate a portfolio of discourses of "the future" collected from pop culture, and write a final project on a topic of their choice.
ANT*399 IS:Independent Study 1.0   3
ANT*415 American Subcultures 4.0 Gen.Educ:College Comp.II 4
  PreReq: ANT200 Intro.Anthropology and Jr or Sr standing,or Permission of Instructor
  This course surveys different contemporary and recent subcultures (music-based youth, criminal, conspiracy-oriented, religions, and those based on alternative forms of sexuality and kinship) through the lens of various modes of social analysis in order to appreciate the diversity of our society and to examine issues such as power, class, gender, sexuality, and resistance. This course satisfies the Triad Education Social Science or College Composition II requirement. Prerequisite: ANT 200 and junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.
ANT*431 ST:Politics of Indigenous Identity in Latin America 2.0 Gen.Educ:Lang/Global Issues 4
  Each time this course is taught it will address a different issue or event that receives a great deal of attention in contemporary Latin American anthroplogy. Students will explore the topic in-depth, using current anthropological journals and recent books. The course may be repeated for credit as long as the topic has changed and may be used for partial completion of the Triad Education Socal Science or Language/Global Issues course requirement. Prerequisite: ANT 200 Intro.to Anthropology or ANT 241 Native Peoples of Mexico.
ANT*432 Issues in Mayan Studies 2.0    
  This upper level seminar examines recent ethnohistorical and anthropological work on the Mayan peoples of Central America and southern Mexico. The course will include critical examinations of the changing scholarly paradigms used to interpret prehispanic society, the Spanish invasion, and the contemporary survival and revitalization of Maya culture. This course is intended for upper level Anthropology and Global Studies majors, and the prerequisite is ANT 200 (Introduction to Anthropology), ANT 105 (Survey of Latin America), or the professor's permission. The course may be repeated for credit as long as the topic has changed and may be used for partial completion of the Triad Education Socal Science or Language/Global Issues course requirement.
ANT*433 Masculinities in Latin America 2.0   4
  Each time this course is taught it will address a different issue or event that receives a great deal of attention in contemporary Latin American anthroplogy. Students will explore the topic in-depth, using current anthropologcial journals and recent books. The course may be repeated for credit as long as the topic has changed and may be used for partial completion of the Triad Education Socal Science or Language/Global Issues course requirement. Term 4/Spg02 Current Scandals in Anthropology. This course focuses in depth on all the issues surrounding two contemporary controversies. First, we will look at the controversy surrounding David Stoll's claim that many of the incidents in I, Rogoberta Menchu,the famous Guatemalan testimonial,did not happen. Then we will move on and look at the debate over allegations of unethical practices by the famous American anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon in his work with the Venezuelan Yanomamo people. By focusing on these debates, we will address broader questions about the nature of truth, science, memory, and power. PREREQUISITE: ANT200 Intro.to Anthropology or ANT105 Survey of Latin America. Upper-class status is preferred.
ANT*434 Native Peoples of Southern Mexico 2.0    
ANT*435 Native Peoples of Oaxaca 2.0   4
ANT*479 Supervised Internship 16.0   4
  Variable credit 1-16 cr. The internship is a supervised work experience in an approved setting. One academic credit my be earned for each 40 hours of work in the internship placement. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and departmental approval, prior to registration, of a written proposal that describes in detail the activities and educational objectives of the intern. Application materials may be obtained from Anthropology faculty members or the Social Sciences Department Chair.
ANT*490 ST:Subcultures of North America 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 4
  In-depth consideration of a topic of particular concern within the disciplines of anthropology. May be repeated for credit under different topics.
ANT*491 ST:Activism in Appalachia 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 4
ANT*492 ST:Women and Appalachia 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 3
  PreReq: ANT135 Intro.Appal.Studies,or WMS100 Intro Womens Studies, and Jr/Sr standing, or Permission of Instructor
  Interdisciplinary seminar covering recent historical, sociological, anthropological and literary studies of women in southern Appalachia. Involves substantial reading and writing, including a research paper involving an interview and service work (with a woman woking in service to women or children in Appalachia). One day long required field trip. Field trip fee charge of $25.00
ANT*493 Sp.Topics in Anthropology 2.0   4
ANT*494 Sp.Topics in Anthropology 2.0    
ANT*495 Sp.Topics in Anthropology      
ANT*496 Sp.Topics in Anthropology      
ANT*497 Sp.Topics in Anthropology      
ANT*498 Sp.Topics in Anthropology      
ANT*499 IS:Independent Study
SOC*100 Intro.to Sociology 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science  
  This course is an introduction to the basic principles and procedures of sociology. Topics range from the micro-level analysis of everyday life (why don't we bump into each other when we cross the street?) to the macro-level analysis of inequality (will the poor always be with us?). Major topics include culture, socialization, deviance, and stratification. This course satisfies the Triad Education Social Science course requirement.
SOC*211 The Family 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science  
  This course is a comparative study of the family as a social institution and as the most intimate environment of interpersonal relations. The course focuses on social and economic factors causing changes in family patterns and on the roles and relationships of marriage and child-rearing. This course satisfies the Triad Education Social Science course requirement.
SOC*251 Societies in Southeast Asia 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
  This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the countries, societies and culture of Southeast Asia. It explores both regional patterns and uniquely local features of societies. Southeast Asia was for centuries a crossroad region between India and China, and then between Europe and the Orient. Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Confucianism, and Christianity have all gained large followings, and the region's patchwork of cultures reflects an evolving blend of these diverse historical and religious influences and the indigenous ideas and institutions that they encountered. This course provides a sense of the geography and history of the region while exploring some local social, cultural, political, and economic issues
SOC*261 Societies of Sub-Saharan Africa 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
  PreReq: SOC100 -or- ANT100
  This course explores Africa, south of the Sahara, from the perspective of sociology and cultural anthroplogy. A substantial overview of Sub- Saharan African politics, social conditions and challenges to development sets the broader context for the course. More focused inquiries on a number of integrated themes-- such as community, transformation and human rights-- within specific national contexts provide students with the opportunity to explore particular case studies that illustrate the richness and socio- cultural complexities in Sub- Saharan Africa.
SOC*271 Environmental Sociology 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
  This course focuses on the interrelationship between natural and social environments. Although the course covers a broad range of issues, emphasis will be given to the development of environmental sociology; perspectives in environmental sociology; environment and culture; environmental justice; the interrelationship or ideology, materialism, and the environment; global environmental issues; and environmental activism. This course satisfies the Triad Education Social Science course requirement.
SOC*279 Supervised Internship in Sociology 16.0   4
  The internship is a supervised work experience in an approved setting. One academic credit may be earned for each 40 hours of work in the internship placement. Prerequisite: Departmental approval, prior to registration, of a written proposal that describes in detail the activities and educational objectives of the intern. Application materials may be obtained from Sociology faculty members of the Social Sciences Department Chair.
SOC*290 ST:Law &Society 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
  This course will focus on law as a social process involving rules of civil conduct which command what is right & proscribe what is wrong based on societal values & who controls the legal apparatus. Attention will be given to law as both an instrument of social control & a mechanism for social change. Special emphasis will be given to race, class, & sex variables. Readings, class discussion, videos, speakers, debate, attending court, & student research are all components of the class learning & interaction. There will also be an optional class service project.
SOC*291 ST:Indonesia in Transition 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
  This course provides opportunities for students to prepare themselves for the world wide fidld course in giving information, background knowledge and understanding of Indonesian culture (including language) and the nature of societal transformations undergoing in Indonesia
SOC*292 ST:Contemporary Urban Issues 4.0    
SOC*293 Sp. Topics in Sociology 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
  SOC 293 Environmental Sociology This course is designed to enable students to understand and critically analyze the interrelationship between the physical and natural envrionments and the human and social environments based on the sociological perspective. To understand the interaction between human societies and the natural world requires an examination of our assumptions underlying the structure and organization of the society. This course will improve our understanding about the interaction between different systems in the environment based on a sociological approach.
SOC*295 ST:Constructing Sexualities 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
  The focus of this course is to trace the main theories, issues and events connected to conceptions and practices of and relating to sexuality in the US. The course approaches the subject with a sociological perspective while also integrating in material from a variety of other disciplines. Special attention will be given to issues pertaining to race, class and gender.
SOC*296 ST:Race, Class & Gender Inequalities 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
  This course explores social inequality through an analysis of the multiple intersections of race, class, and gender. This framework provides an opportunity to study how access to social power and priviledge is shaped by the interconnected nature of race, class, and gender-based inequality at play in social institutions such as work and education. Global patterns of inequality are also examined by applying an intersectional framework to illustrate the mutually reinforcing nature of these forms of oppression in several world regions. The course explores diverse experiences of inequality through a variety of theoretical and case study analyses of the intersections of race, class, and gender.
SOC*297 ST:Thailand and Thai Societies 2.0    
  This course is designed to provide an overview of the history, culture, and social relations in contemporary Thai societes. This background information will be pivotal for the students who are taking the Thailand worldwide course and those who would like to understand Thai societies and cultures. As other Southeast Asian societies, Thai societies are rich in culture and history albeit its diversity and stratification. This course will address social structure, stratification and cultures of Thai societies. Special attention will be given to the analysis of intersection and interconnection of class, gender, ethnic and regional relations in Thai societies.
SOC*298 ST:Women and Society 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 2
  This course is an analysis of women in the United States emphasizing historical and contemporary relationships of women to education, religion, law, politics, family, and sexuality.
SOC*299 IS:Independent Study 1.0    
SOC*317 Social Theory 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science  
  PreReq: SOC 100 and ANT 200.
  This course represents a critical examination of selected classical and contemporary models of the social world from the perspective of both sociology and anthropology. The foundations of social thought, the content of major theories and theory groups, the socio-cultural setting within which they developed, and their broader intellectual relavence will be considered. This course satifies the Triad Education Social Science course requirement.
SOC*321 Social Problems 4.0   3
  PreReq: Soc100,or permission of instructor.
  This course is designed to provide students with an integrated framework for exploring the construction of social problems from a variety of theoretical and applied perspectives. By analyzing the interrelated nature of social stratification and deviance, this course offers an in-depth understanding of institutional power structures at the local, national, and global levels. Throughout the course, students will gain critical thinking skills to analyze constructions of social problems in the media through the use of current news content from diverse sources. Students will also develop the ability to apply these skills to the development of viable solutions to global social problems by linking theory to action in a number of social contexts.
SOC*325 Gender, Development and the Environment 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 3
  PreReq: SOC100 Intro to Sociology,or permission of instructor
  This course will examine changes in gender relations and the lives of women in developing countries that are due to the development process and their incorporation into global economic and political systems. Special focus is given on the interconnection of gender issues, development, and environmental problems in developing countries. This course satisfies the Triad Social Science or Language/Global issues course requirement.
SOC*366 Feminist Thought 4.0 Gen.Educ:College Comp.II 3
  PreReq: WMS100 ,or permission of instructor
  Feminist thought is not one unified body, but has many influences and debates within it. In this course students will explore the development of feminist thought, examine the key debates among feminists, see how theory is applied to action through particular case studies, and learn how feminism has influenced the course of other social sciences and methodologies. This course satisfies the Triad Education Social Science course requirement. Prerequisite: WMS 100 Introduction to Women's Studies and junior or senior standing.
SOC*377 Thailand:Social Changes and Social Inequalities 3.0 WWC Study Abroad 3
  PreReq: Permission of Wld Wide Office,SOC261 Soc.SubSahara Africa,SOC100 or ANT200 (recommended)
  This course is designed to provide an overview of the history, culture, and social relations in contemporary Thai sociey. Special focus will be given to issues related to social stratification and inequalities based on gender, age, and ethnicity. As other Southeast Asian societies, Thai society is a stratified society in which social statuses are maintained and perpetuated through daily social interaction and various social institutions. Since social changes do not take place evenly in society, these changes may exacerbate social inequalities. The course will examine the interconnection of social change and development, and critically analyze the impact of the process on different groups in the society. The course will give special attention on the effects of social change on women, ethnic minorities and children. Tourism, prostitution, gender relations and the status of ethnic minorities and children are among the main topics discussed in the class.
SOC*391 ST:Postcolonial Feminism 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 3
  PreReq: WMS100 Intro.Women's Studies
  This course explores feminism in a variety of postcolonial world regions.Throughout a number of societies, women as colonized subjects have been labeled as "other." These historical contexts of colonialism create distinct interpretations of "feminism" in relation to mutually reinforcing forms of political, economic and racial domination. This course deconstructs a universal notion of feminism through in-depth comparative analyses of women's movements in several postcolonial societies. The global feminist literature examined throughout this course provides opportunities to explore multiple constructions of women's rights and gender inequality ina variety of international contexts. The course also emphasizes the relationships between local and global women's solidarity movements to identify central connections between feminist theory and transnational activism. Pre-requisite: WMS100 Intro.to Women's Studies.
SOC*392 ST:Gender and Migration 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 4
  PreReq: WMS100,orSOC100
  This course explores the relationship between gender and transnational migration in a variety of social contexts. Whereas women have always migrated, they currently comprise the majority of migrants worldwide. Throughout the course, the gendered nature of migration will be situated within broader theories of globalization, development and gender studies. Human rights issues central to forced migration-particulary in the case of refugees-will be covered in detail through a series of case study analyses.
SOC*393 ST:Race, Class and Gender 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 3
  PreReq: SOC100 Intro.to Sociology,or Permission of Instructor
  An examination of race, class, and gender inequalities in the United States, with attention to social inequality regionally, nationally, and globally. The course will explore ethnic identity, race, sex and gender, sexuality, and socio-economic class. Topics include major theoretical approaches to understanding social inequalities, empirical data pertaining to the extent of social inequalities, micro and macro construction and intersections of social inequalities, and historical and contemporary aspects of social inequalities.
SOC*394 ST:Disaster and Society 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 3
  PreReq: SOC100 Intro.Sociology
  This course provides theoretical approach and critical analyses on the interconnection of social structure, inequality and disaster. It also addresses intersection of social system, ecological network and disaster.
SOC*395 ST:Media and Social Inequality 4.0 Gen.Educ:Social Science 3
  People in the United States spend the majority of their leisure time using, interacting with and through, and viewing media. This course will allow students to examine the historical development of media, focusing on mass media, and to examine data pertaining to the ways in which media operate. Students will explore patterns of media ownership, including trends toward consolidation and conglomeration, and discuss ways in which these patterns may shape media content. In addition, course readings and discussion will examine regulations of media, the influences of politics on media and of media on politics, media and violence, and the role of mass media in reflecting and/or shaping social inequality - particularly regarding race, class, gender, and sexual orientation. Students will discuss tools and strategies for critical analysis of media and active responses to media.
SOC*398 International Field Study 4.0    
SOC*399 Intl Development Practicum 4.0    
SOC*402 Sociology/Anthropology Research Craft 4.0   4
  PreReq: ANT200 Intro.Anthropology,SOC100 Intro.Sociology,Permission of Instructor
  This course will cover research methods specific to both sociology and anthropology through directed readings, lectures, and projects designed to prepare the student for the applied research undertaken in SOC 410. Focus will be on field research, field notes, methods of ethnographic documenting, in-depth interviewing, content analysis, and questionnaire development.Prerequisite: SOC 100 Introuction to Sociology or ANT 200 Introduction to Anthropology.
SOC*410 Directed Research in Sociology and Anthropology 4.0 Gen.Educ:College Comp.II  
  PreReq: SOC402
  Students will present a research proposal and engage in applied research. Students' work could be used in the following ways: by agencies in planning or policy development; in articles published for educational purposes; and for cultural documentation for museums, historical associations, communities and/or ethnic groups. This course fullfills the requirements of College Composition II. Prerequisites: SOC 402 Sociology/Anthropology Research Craft and approval from the social sciences internal ethical review board.
SOC*479 Supervised Internship in Sociology 16.0   4
  The internship is a supervised work experience in an approved setting. One academic credit may be earned for each 40 hours of work in the internship placement. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing and departmental approval, prior to registration, of a written proposal that describes in detail the activities and educational objectives of the intern. Application materials may be obtained from Sociology faculty members or the Social Sciences Department Chair.
SOC*490 Sp. Topics in Sociology      
SOC*491 Sp. Topics in Sociology      
SOC*492 Sp. Topics in Sociology      
SOC*493 Sp. Topics in Sociology      
SOC*494 Sp. Topics in Sociology      
SOC*495 Sp. Topics in Sociology
SOC*496 Sp. Topics in Sociology      
SOC*497 Sp. Topics in Sociology      
SOC*498 Sp. Topics in Sociology      
SOC*499 IS:Independent Study 1.0