MINOR

What You’ll Study

Through this minor, you will develop a comprehensive perspective on how peoples of African descent continue to influence and contribute to the global experience. Our required core courses of Cultures of Sub-Saharan Africa and African-American History help you make make solid connections between the African continent and the United States. And the interdisciplinary perspective of the minor allow you to take courses from a range of disciplines, including:

  • Anthropology
  • Art
  • English
  • Global Studies
  • History
  • Music
  • Peace and Justice Studies
  • Religion

Get Engaged

Students minoring in Africana Studies also regularly involve themselves in a variety of student organizations and activities, including:

  • WIDE: The Wilson Inclusion, Diversion and Equity Office
  • Showing Up for Racial Justice (SURG)
  • Participation in Intersect: Diversity and Leadership annual conference

Explore Classes in This Program

REL 254

Critical Race Theory

Because much of the African diaspora resulted from the immensely global reach of the Transatlantic Slave Trade, it is crucial to understand these processes in terms of race and to engage in thinking about race critically. This course examines the origins of race-thinking and the myriad ways in which race has been constructed and deconstructed. You’ll focus on a critical interpretation of what race is, what it does, and how contemporary racial meanings are produced and reproduced.

MUS 286

Jazz Appreciation

Jazz originated, developed, and evolved in the United States; it is a significant American contribution to the world of music. Like any great music, it has progressed through distinguishable periods and introduced outstanding musicians to society and the world. In this course, you’ll study the history of jazz by tracing its emergence at the turn of the twentieth century, through the proliferation of styles current today. Through assigned readings, listening to recordings, watching videotaped performances, and attending live concerts, understanding and appreciation of swing, bebop, cool, and free jazz will be fostered.

REL 310

Race, Morality and the Politics of Crime

This course examines the historical antecedent of the present-day prison system and the multiple dimensions in which criminal justice policies impact particular communities today. The course begins with a focus on philosophies of punishment, theologies of race, and nineteenth-century economies of plantations, jails, and prisons. You’ll then examine present-day patterns of punishment, specifically addressing moral discourse in contemporary politics, the school-to-prison pipeline, and successful activist challenges to the pervasiveness of exploiting criminalized persons.

Meet Our Faculty

I love that Warren Wilson allows me to be my own quirky self both in and outside of the classroom. If I cannot be honest and true to who I am while teaching and learning, then what's the point? The kinds of connections I am able to make with students here are invaluable; I am always learning from them, always being challenged and always growing along with them.

Christey Carwile, Ph.D.
Christey Carwile
Christey Carwile, Ph.D.
Rima Vesely-Flad

I love teaching students who are committed to learning theory and working for social justice. This kind of engaged scholarship will move the world forward.

Rima Vesely-Flad, Ph.D.
Rima Vesely-Flad
Rima Vesely-Flad, Ph.D.
Carol Howard

I love that all our first-year seminars partner with a local non-profit whose mission is related to the academic theme of the course. Students are asked to reflect upon why the organization is meaningful, and whether it’s the kind of work they might like to do upon graduation.

Carol Howard, Ph.D.
Carol Howard
Carol Howard, Ph.D.
David Mycoff

The proof of the pudding is in the eating. What our students — our alumni — make of themselves and what they make of whatever corner of the world they cultivate; that is the definitive outcome through which we know whether or not our work is effective. And they have made and continue to make remarkable things indeed.

David A. Mycoff, Ph.D.
David Mycoff
David A. Mycoff, Ph.D.
Angela Phillips

When we train students to critically examine their lives and to look beyond their individual experiences we are investing these students with many of the important tools that they need to successfully navigate the future in an increasingly global world.

Angela M. Phillips, Ph.D.
Angela Phillips
Angela M. Phillips, Ph.D.
Christey Carwile
Step Team
Student Activities

Movement as Justice

Dance Matters: Stepping Towards Racial Equity was an interactive workshop hosted on campus by Maryland’s Dance Exchange, a nationally-renowned dance company that uses movement to build community and address issues of social justice.