BA MAJOR & MINOR

Global Perspective

How much of our life is predetermined? Can we avoid poverty or gain wealth largely because of where we live or who are parents are? Are there thoughts that we cannot express (or even conceive of) with our native language? How much is our future determined by our culture, our past, and the place we call home? How can we change that? Global studies attempts to answer these and other vital questions.

Are you interested in working with an NGO, the Peace Corps, becoming a diplomat, being an international entrepreneur, or just having a deep and nuanced understanding of the world around you? If so, then this is the major for you. Geography, geopolitics, ecology, the social sciences, and the humanities are all connected in the rich, interdisciplinary field of global studies.

What You’ll Study

Introductory courses provide an overview of world geography, specific introductions to world regions, and the perspectives of different disciplines. Upper level courses combine some comparative breadth across different regions and disciplines and depth gained from a focus on one region. The major requires you to study language, engage in experiential education through travel, and undertake a senior capstone project.

Refine your interests by choosing a thematic concentration:

  • Culture, Power, and Place – Explore globalization’s impact on customs and institutions, as well as how such developments relate to contested notions of identity, place, and nation.
  • Environment & Society – Examine the intersection of politics, the economy, and the environment within the context of globalization.
  • Peace & Social Justice – Consider the roles of peace, war, and justice in the era of globalization.
  • The Local & The Global – Investigate contemporary Appalachia in comparative, interdisciplinary, and global frameworks.

We will prepare you to be a responsible citizen of the world by challenging you to understand contemporary global issues. You’ll graduate with an appreciation of the historical and geographical contexts of global inequalities after immersing yourself in research that integrates the humanities, the social sciences, and environmental studies.

Explore Classes in This Program

GBL 117

Introduction to Global Studies

Get started with an introduction to the broad scope of the interdisciplinary field of global studies. You’ll explore the unequal distribution of humans, resources, wealth, and other phenomena across the globe and examine the root causes and local effects of these geographic patterns. By examining the many ways in which our world is portrayed – in text, on film, and especially with maps – you will start to appreciate and understand the economic, cultural, and political impacts of globalization on human-environment interactions.

GBL 305

Thinking Globally: Contemporary Globalization in Context

Just how does one “think globally?” Globalization is arguably the key organizing construct of our time, yet understanding just what it is and what it means for people and places around the globe is difficult. This advanced course focuses on the concepts, theories, thinkers, and debates in contemporary globalization studies. The course provides a solid grounding in globalization thought as you prepare to undertake your own research in the Global Studies Capstone Seminar.

GBL 331

The Cold War, Globalization, and Popular Culture

The Cold War is an excellent lens through which we can see the history of globalization and the power dynamics within the contemporary world system. First, you’ll learn about the international history of the Cold War. Second, you’ll explore the role of popular culture in that struggle through case studies about subjects ranging from literature in Southeast Asia and art in Europe to jazz in Africa and film making across the globe.

Meet Our Faculty

Warren Wilson students crave a challenge. I am continually amazed at the enthusiasm with which our students throw themselves into an endeavor, whether it be a physically exhausting service trip or an intellectually stimulating research question. Wilson students tend to say “bring it.”

David Abernathy, Ph.D.
David Abernathy
David Abernathy, Ph.D.
Christey Carwile

I love that Warren Wilson allows me to be my own quirky self both in and outside of the classroom. If I cannot be honest and true to who I am while teaching and learning, then what's the point? The kinds of connections I am able to make with students here are invaluable; I am always learning from them, always being challenged and always growing along with them.

Christey Carwile, Ph.D.
Christey Carwile
Christey Carwile, Ph.D.
Ben Feinberg

At Warren Wilson, we have the time we need to know our students as real, complete, complicated human beings, not just a butt in a seat and a name on a paper.

Ben Feinberg, Ph.D.
Ben Feinberg
Ben Feinberg, Ph.D.
Dongping Han

I like Warren Wilson students because they have a strong sense of social justice. They care about the environment, about what is going on in the world, and want to make our world a better place.

Dongping Han, Ph.D.
Dongping Han
Dongping Han, Ph.D.
Phil Jamison with banjo

I am fortunate to work at an institution that allows me to split my time between two subjects that I love to teach: mathematics and music. As I am constantly reminded, there is a connection between them, and it is not unusual for me to see some of the same students in my classes in both departments.

Phil Jamison, M.S., M.A.
Phil Jamison with banjo
Phil Jamison, M.S., M.A.
Kevin Kehrberg

As a professor, I love that Warren Wilson students are unafraid to take risks, to challenge themselves, and to engage a topic or a work of art despite whether it aligns with their opinions or preferences.

Kevin Kehrberg, Ph.D.
Kevin Kehrberg
Kevin Kehrberg, Ph.D.

I believe curiosity is the seed of hope. I approach education as a way to cultivate my students' curiosities about the world and how they can engage with it.

Jeffrey A. Keith, Ph.D.
Jeffrey A. Keith, Ph.D.
As one of Indonesia’s “Traveling World Class Professors,” Warren Wilson College professor Siti Kusujiarti is building a collaborative research partnership with Jenderal Soedirman University faculty members.

Warren Wilson students are poised to learn and to expand their horizons.

Siti Kusujiarti, Ph.D.
As one of Indonesia’s “Traveling World Class Professors,” Warren Wilson College professor Siti Kusujiarti is building a collaborative research partnership with Jenderal Soedirman University faculty members.
Siti Kusujiarti, Ph.D.

Work, service, learning… I fell in love with the college, the farm, and the triad. Working with students who share the college vision with such passion and dedication is a daily inspiration.

David G. Moore, Ph.D.
David G. Moore, Ph.D.
Angela Phillips

When we train students to critically examine their lives and to look beyond their individual experiences we are investing these students with many of the important tools that they need to successfully navigate the future in an increasingly global world.

Angela M. Phillips, Ph.D.
Angela Phillips
Angela M. Phillips, Ph.D.
David Abernathy
Joanne Beer
Meet Our Students

International Experience

“As a Global Studies major, I received a well-rounded education combining politics, cross-cultural studies, language, international affairs, and anthropology. In four years I studied in Brazil, India, and Sri Lanka. I also tutored local ESL students and wrote a thesis on global poverty. Global Studies is for students who want the best of Warren Wilson and the world.”

– Joanne Beer ’05

After graudating in 2005, Jo traveled in Sweden, worked in Chile for a year, then attended a master’s program at New York University’s branch campus in Israel.

Today Jo works in global business development, specializing in combatting international financial crime and money laundering.

You can read more about Jo’s experiences in global studies in this article from the Christian Science Monitor.