Why Study Language?

Once you’ve packed, prepared, and traveled across the globe, there is often still the invisible wall of an unknown language.  Lacking fluency can be like having your hands tied, making the simplest everyday tasks much harder.  Likewise, reading a translation of a work in your field — provided one has been published — is like receiving the words second-hand.  Making a difference in the world often requires the ability to speak, think, and live outside English.  Earning our minor in modern languages gives you the tools to succeed in a career or graduate studies that involve Spanish or French-speaking cultures.

What You’ll Study

The modern languages minor combines language training with service and work in domestic and international settings.  It provides you with both experiential and academic understanding of a language and the concept of cross-cultural communication more broadly.  The goals of the modern language program are:
  • To enable students to study university level courses abroad in the target language.
  • To ensure that students can use Spanish or French in their areas of expertise.
  • To enable students to navigate the cultural conventions of the Spanish or French speaking world.
  • To give students advanced level competence in all levels of language study.
  • To prepare students for graduate studies.

The Perfect Companion to Your Major

Whether you’re pursuing anthropology and studying South American cultures, or exploring the economics of food trucks in Los Angeles, pursuing the modern languages minor with Spanish will make all the difference.  With an understanding of French, you could dig deep into continental philosophy or European history.  Studying in the humanities or social sciences and want to go to graduate school?  Having French will help you with the language entrance exam.  Want to set your resume apart?  Spanish fluency will do that.  These are just some of the many, many ways that the modern language minor can help create an extraordinary Warren Wilson education.

Explore Classes in This Program

LAN 3520

Latin American Cinema

This course addresses the evolution of Latin America’s film industry, its significance in nation building efforts, and its influence in asserting Latin American nations as full participants in the global game of creating images of the “other.” In this course, you’ll explore the mechanisms and theories used by Latin American filmmakers to further, rationalize, and portray Latin American cultural identities. The course is taught entirely in Spanish.

LAN 3710

Term-Length International Program Course

This course is a study of a variety of topics relating to Spanish-speaking regions of the world, with particular focus on the country you will visit. Topics may include elements of history, geography, cultural studies, economics, literature, and Spanish language. This course is available through our International Program.

LAN 4650

Francophone Literature

This course concentrates on 20th century literature. You’ll read novels, essays, and plays, with class analysis emphasizing the relation between literary texts and other social and cultural concerns; the question of identity; post-colonialism; the family; and the relation between French and francophone literature. The aim of the course is to engage you with 20th-century francophone literature, to sharpen your critical skills, and to provide experience writing analytically in French.

Meet Our Faculty

What do I love about Wilson? My students of course, together we create a learning experience that energizes us to initiate change.

Erin Montero, Ph.D.
Erin Montero
Erin Montero, Ph.D.
Angela Phillips

When we train students to critically examine their lives and to look beyond their individual experiences we are investing these students with many of the important tools that they need to successfully navigate the future in an increasingly global world.

Angela M. Phillips, Ph.D.
Angela Phillips
Angela M. Phillips, Ph.D.
Christine Swoap

At Warren Wilson, I see creativity, sensitivity and a willingness to engage with others in meaningful ways. Professors and students work collaboratively towards various educative goals, taking risks while being advocates for themselves and others. All of this inspires me.

Christine LaRocque Swoap, M.A.
Christine Swoap
Christine LaRocque Swoap, M.A.
Erin Montero