MINOR

What You’ll Study

Explore the intricacies of the mind and human behavior from theoretical, philosophical, and empirical perspectives.

Professors go beyond the traditional classroom with experiential learning techniques, such as:

  • service projects
  • data collection and analysis
  • virtual rats
  • field work

Meet Professor Jen Mozolic

With her background in cognitive neuroscience, psychology professor Jennifer Mozolic says she is “fascinated by the way the brain supports human thought and behavior. In my classes, I love connecting students to the basics of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology by providing them opportunities to experience things firsthand – like touching a human brain or hearing nerve cells sending signals.”

With Professor Mozolic’s guidance, you’ll learn brain-behvaior fundamentals in the classroom, lab, and within the community. Students consistently describe Mozolic with such adjectives as challenging, supportive, and dedicated.

“It is really exciting to see students use their understanding of the brain to explore complex abilities like sensory perception, movement, learning and memory,” Mozolic says. “Many students are passionate about gaining insight into conditions such as dyslexia, ADHD, autism, addiction and Alzheimer’s Disease that have had an impact on their lives or the lives of their loved ones.”

Explore Classes in This Program

PSY 310

Biopsychology I

Biopsychology is the study of how our behavior, thoughts, and emotions are supported by the nervous system. Learn about the fundamental brain structures and biological processes that underlie many different behaviors and disorders studied by psychologists, including development, brain injury, autism, movement, motivation, and addiction. If you love this course, then Biopsychology II expands the topic to include neuroplasticity, stroke, memory, and language.

PSY 324

Sensation and Perception

Explore how human beings gather and interpret information provided by the sensory systems. We’ll examine the physical properties of the sensory signal; the physiological mechanisms of the sensory organs; and the psychological processes that filter, construct, and influence our perceptual experiences.

PSY 425

Social Neuroscience

Integrate theories and methods of social psychology and cognitive neuroscience in order to explain social and emotional behavior. Students use key concepts and methods from social neuroscience to analyze core areas of social psychology, including emotional appraisal, person perception, emotion regulation, stereotyping, attitudes and beliefs, social decision making, cooperation, personality, and individual differences.

Meet Our Faculty

I love teaching at Warren Wilson because the students are so interesting and engaging. I'm incredibly lucky that I have a job where I get to come to work every day and learn something new or think about the world in a different way.

Jen Mozolic, Ph.D.
Jen Mozolic
Jen Mozolic, Ph.D.
Robert Swoap

Teaching at Wilson keeps me young. My students often laugh at my silliness, but they know I would do almost anything for them to thrive. I see myself as a guide and a mentor. For that, I feel deeply grateful.

Robert Swoap, Ph.D.
Robert Swoap
Robert Swoap, Ph.D.
Martha Knight-Oakley

My students love complexity. They want to understand people in all our beautiful, gory detail. They want to have an impact on quality of life. They absolutely inspire me with their questions and research and action.

Martha Knight-Oakley, Ph.D.
Martha Knight-Oakley
Martha Knight-Oakley, Ph.D.
Cristina Reitz-Krueger

I believe in the power of social sciences to change the world for the better, and I love working with students who want to get out there and actually make those changes!

Cristina L. Reitz-Krueger, Ph.D.
Cristina Reitz-Krueger
Cristina L. Reitz-Krueger, Ph.D.
Jen Mozolic
Hinds Feet Farm
Meet Our Students

Neuroscience with a Personal Touch

The ‘Explorations of the Psychology Major’ class visited Hinds Feet Farm (HFF), a day program for people recovering from an acquired or traumatic brain injury.

The Psychology Department has partnered with HFF for more than five years in a number of courses; together, they engage in various activities from murals and brochures to listening projects.

“The social interaction and engagement with Warren Wilson students set a great example of working together as a team. It was fun and generated an abundance of smiles; the personalities had open hearts and a caring, compassionate disposition,” the HFF day program coordinator said.

“One of the projects where I see students really flourish is in our collaboration with Hinds’ Feet Farm, a post-rehabilitation program for folks with brain injuries,” professor Jen Mozolic says. “Through this partnership, students work and learn alongside the HFF members to explore their interests and values; complete artistic and informational projects like paintings, podcasts and documentary films; and educate the wider community about the causes and effects of brain injury.”